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How to Set Your Remote Company for Success with Dianne Crampton

Businesswoman and author, Dianne Crampton, has more than 20 years of experience working and managing teams remotely. She is the founder of the management consulting company TIGERS Success Series.

During her many years of experience and research, she discovered the six values that are key to building ethical, quality-focused, productive, motivated, and enthusiastic groups of people: Trust, Interdependence, Genuineness, Empathy, Risk, and Success.  

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Succesful business woman

Luis:

Welcome ladies and gentlemen to another episode of the DistantJob Podcast. I am your host as usual in this podcast that’s all about building and leading awesome remote teams. And my guest today is Dianne Crampton. Dianne is a business woman and author, a one off North Americans leading authorities on authentic team culture, the founder of the management consulting company, TIGER Success Series. She has presented and spoken at the United Nations sponsored conference, and the National Institute of Applied Business Ethics. Crampton their first book, TIGERS Among Us in 2010 and that’s contributed to several other books in the field, her business has been nominated by Merrill Lynch for the Western Region Inc Magazine Entrepreneurial Awards where should received an honorable mention for successful work in Group Dynamics and there are TIGERS team wheel facilitation tool. She is also a recipient of the Young Woman of America Award and that she is launching a new book. The book is coming June 19 Becoming TIGERS. Leading Your Team to Success is the name. Dianne, thank you so much for coming on the show.

Dianne:

Well and Luis, thank you for so much for having me. It’s good to be here.

Luis:

It’s great to have you. And well I’m not going to say, and you’re a book elliptic scenario because I don’t want to make things sound worse than they are, but remote work has been in the headlines because as we record this, there is a pandemic going on. So what better time to talk about remote teams, right?

Dianne:

Absolutely. Absolutely.

Luis:

I want to get right into the meat of the things and obviously the COVID-19 thing will pop up now and then as needed, but the reality is that I want this show to be something that people refer to many years from now, hopefully. So I don’t want to tie it too much with the current events, even though current events, we’ll probably be here for a while, but I want to ask first, how has remote work made your business possible, or helped you make it better?

Dianne:

Well, Luis, I started my company and have worked remotely with my team almost since the inception of my company. So I have been working and building remote teams for over 20 years. And one of the reasons for that, I was divorced. I had a two year old and I wanted to work out of my home creating companies and working with companies remotely. And thank goodness technology has kept up with my vision. It’s really something to be able to build the type of work community with people all over the world. When we talk about diversity in the United States, it’s like, well what color meat suit do you wear? Right? Well the reality is if you’re a global citizen or if you work in a global capacity with companies all around the world, being able to understand humans and how we interact and what we actually can create with our geniuses is the driving force. So remote work truly was an inception for my company and technology has now even made it easier. Like you and I are chatting right now and could see each other.

Luis:

So did you have any light bulb moment where you realize that, wow, this way of building companies, this way of managing teams is really going to change the way businesses operate and are created. And tell me the story behind that. How was the day when you realize that?

Dianne:

Well, I launched at a time when there weren’t a lot of female corporate executives.

Luis:

There still are.

Dianne:

That were consulting and I launched at a time when brick and mortar was the way everything was done. So what people would do is they would hire somebody, they paid hardly anything to, to answer the phone for them. Just sit and wait for the phone to ring all day. And I learned or I figured out, my gosh, look at this. There’s phone answering machines, there’s four phone answering recorders. Why don’t I just put, when I’m talking to somebody on the phone, I don’t want somebody either number one saying that I’m not in the office when I am or lying for me or anything like that. Because that was the common practice back then.

Dianne:

Somebody didn’t want to talk to you, they could lie about it. So I started putting my messages on a phone, the old low tech phone answering machine and a very well known consultant in our area said, do you know how much money I have spent to have somebody answer my phone and to actually have a brick and mortar place to work where people don’t come because I go out to their companies to meet anyway. And I said, no, just humor me how much are you spending? And well it was a huge amount of money. We were talking probably that time, $800 a month rent and we were probably at that time looking at $20,000 for that employee per year who is bored stiff.

Dianne:

And maybe even not working from their own value basis of my bosses here. I have to tell people he’s busy or somewhere else and I don’t like lying. And the turnover for those office workers was also pretty high. So then you add expense.

Luis:

Wonder why.

Dianne:

You add the expense to that of having to reinterview, rehire all of the energy that goes into that. If you’re going to build a team with that employee, you’ve just lost all of that. And so from the get go I was, I guess there’s the vision of a rat in the maze. Rats will find the cheese. They will look at different ways of getting to that cheese. And for me the cheese was how do I operate most efficiently, most effectively, cost-effectively so that I don’t have to have record high fees for my services so I can work with more people, so that more people are helped and spread the TIGER’S message to more employees. Because really Louis we changed the world one team at a time.

Luis:

Nice. So let’s talk a bit more about that changing the world one team at the time. So I have a friend that came to me actually just this week. He is in one of those situations where suddenly he asked to have all these people working through telework, and telework I mean I’m using this weird word that I never used on the podcast just because it’s been… I’m based in Portugal and this is the word that we use here in Portugal. And I for some reason I’m lapsing into it instead of saying remote work as I usually do, so sorry for the confusion audience, I should be back to my regular itself in a couple of weeks. But anyway, he asked me because it’s a new situation for him. He told me, look, culture is important for me. My company, I’ve been building this team for less than one year.

Luis:

And I felt that the culture was emerging just by people being in the same location and I can do that now and when I go online and I read this article and that and this book, it always sounds vague and not actionable. He had me and so he asked me just give me a list of steps. When you have a company, when you have a business that is growing fully remotely, what is the recipe? What is the process to make sure that you are also building, generating a natural company culture.

Luis:

And before you answer, I want to give my usual caveat here that the book I always give one to guests as a book out or a course out that this podcast is not the Cliff notes version. People listening should still go out and buy the book or buy the course or whatever or hire the services because there’s no way a 45 minute long podcast can be a replacement for a more extensive piece of learning. So with that caveat said loud and clear that just listening to what you’re going to say now is not going to be enough. I would still challenge you to answer the question that my friend put to me.

Dianne:

All right, well there’s two things I want to cover from the 50,000 foot level. All right? There is when I started TIGERS I wanted to know what makes a good group of people ethical, quality focused, productive, cooperative, and successful. And so my study involved all the group dynamic research I could find in business education and psychology. And out of that came six principles. They’re all validated, they’re all measurable. I mean, it’s something that your friend could actually assess his team and figure out exactly what it is that his team needs to thrive. But those six principles are trust, inter-dependence, genuineness, empathy, risk, and success. So when you look at those six principles, it doesn’t matter if you are a brick and mortar company or you’re working with an entire virtual team, human beings need to have those qualities to operate in a most engaged and successful way.

Dianne:

So then you take it a step further and I’m going to take us up, put us up back up to the 50,000 foot level. There are certain group structures that need to be in place. Again, whether you’re working face to face or working across the world. And there are certain things that leaders need to do to organize this. And there’re certain things that I need to do in order to really build and thrive and build community among one another. So from the leadership friend who asked you the question about, give me a list of things to do.

Dianne:

Your friend’s role is extremely important. He needs to establish very, very clear goals. Those goals can’t be left to the imagination because when you work virtually those goals have to be so clear, so clean. Nobody has to wonder if they’re on target or if they’re off target. Also, there’s motivating assignments that this leader is responsible for. And also hiring the right people. It becomes more critical to make sure that people are self motivated, self-directed, can work on task, and also balance their lives.

Dianne:

Because one of the threats for human health when you work virtually is that you work too long. You got to get up from your computer, you got to go exercise, you gotta go feed your cat. You need to do the human things that are required to stay on life balance. So hiring the right people, creating those motivating assignments and goals are really the critical so people can structure their time and live like a human being as opposed to a robot. There needs to be very clear roles. The roles that people do, what they’re supposed to do, how they’re supposed to do it, who’s in charge, who’s on point at any one point in achieving those clear goals. Also, people need to have the sufficient time to get things done. Now you and I both know that if we can meet side by side at a water cooler and have the power chat that doesn’t take more than five minutes.

Dianne:

Maybe I’m stuck on something and you just inspired my new idea that shifts me off of being stuck. Well, when you’re working virtually, yes, we can meet face to face on zoom or we can share a white whiteboard or something like that that happens. But it’s building a little bit more time into the project management timeline to make sure that those conversations can happen. So your friend also needs to know how to build good relationships with people across the world. I’ve Got some great stories, but we can get to that later. But building those, those relationships are really important because if you look at the core functions of an organization, it’s based on roles, goals, and relationships. Imagine it as a triangle. All right, you’ve got roles, goals and relationships at each point.

Dianne:

Well what connects them are relationships. Each of those points are connected by relationships. So building those relationships is absolutely critical. I got a story about that too. We can get to it, but we need to make sure also Louis that the rewards that the organization offers are consistent with the values of the company and the objectives. So if your friend has not thought through how do we reward people for their excellent work who are working on teams, what are human beings? And it’s important to get to know what’s important to people and that’s what they want. Those are the rewards they want, your friend also needs to get real clear and this is his or her job is to provide timely and accurate information and feedback. It’s a huge communication function, bigger communication function, working virtually than it is in a company. And quite frankly, leaders fail horribly frequently in the communication arena with people and employees. Pardon me.

Luis:

Why are some of those common failures and how’d you avoid them?

Dianne:

They believe that they can communicate between with their underlings. So they will… have you ever played a game? I don’t know if you play this type of game in Portugal, where you have a group of people and you tell a secret to one person and they turn around and tell the secret to the next person.

Luis:

Yeah. Broken telephone.

Dianne:

Right. Yeah, exactly. So by the time it gets to the end person, that a message that started from the CEO, does not represent what the clear goal, the motivating assignment, the clear role, the expectations, whatever that communication was.

Luis:

Because I think that when you’re dealing with people that have different main languages and that comes from different cultures, sometimes I think that the message doesn’t even get clearly transmitted to them from the first person to the second. So, that’s something to consider.

Dianne:

Well, exactly. So your friend’s role in communication is when it’s critical. You have either a face to face communication virtually where you can see the expressions on somebody’s space and you can have this candid conversation to ask questions back and forth. So that goal is absolutely crystal clear. That message is absolutely crystal clear. So there’s also, I think, responsibility when it comes to relationships to really get to know somebody and understand what those differences are. And I have a good story about that too, but it’s also important to get together the right tech to run these operations. And I know that there are brilliant, absolutely brilliant technology all over the world. And if an employee knows of one, let’s say from Pakistan, that’s new to be able to communicate that so that the, how people interact and meet virtually is just as easy as working next door to somebody.

Luis:

Yeah. For sure.

Dianne:

So what the managers, what’s your friend’s role is to establish clear goals, motivating assignments, hiring the right people, making sure the rules are clear, giving up sufficient time to get things done, relationship building critical rewards consistent with values and objectives, clear timely information and feedback and getting together the right tech. That’s his or her job.

Luis:

Good points there. Now let me go back to a couple of things. So goals need to be clear. Can you give me some good examples of goals that one can set for themselves when it comes specifically to building culture? And more to the point, because I find it that it’s relatively easy to set goals, but it’s a lot harder to set goals that can be measured. Right? So how do you measure cultural goals? What are some good cultural goals to consider? Obviously not all goals will work for all teams, but something just to inspire and consider.

Dianne:

Well, okay, so something that all organizations do poorly. It should be a critical goal is establishing their group behavior norms. So, with TIGERS we know that if we’re to have trust and let’s see, we have people that were raised in Japan on our team who defer to authority, they listen and they must have permission to speak respectfully, sincere, frank and forthright, which is being genuine. They have to know that doing so helps the team and does not frustrate the leader.

Dianne:

So when you have people from different cultures, because you’ll have cultures that there’s a couple examples. If you’re the tallest blade of grass, you’re the one that gets mowed down first. If you’re the nail that sticks up, you’re the nail that’s going to get hammered down. So when you are problem solving and decision making and innovating, being able to have that group norm clearly identified by the team itself, letting the team actually come up with group behavior norms that are going to keep trust high, respect high, genuineness high, interdependence cooperation high, empathy high, which is really important to how you resolve conflict on a team.

Dianne:

How you minimize risks, which means that it you have to have permission to share your perspective from what we call your truth perspective, which is your accumulated experience, street smarts, your knowledge, what you’ve been educated to do. You have to be able to speak up in groups and be able to share that. And then what does success look like? And when a group, a remote group builds those group behavior norms, we know that the easiest way to change a work culture is through behavior. So when people want it, when people want to keep conflict at a minimum, when people want to respect one another, when people want to learn about the genius that each person brings to the team, group norms are critical and that the old school belief is you have your vision, mission, and values.

Dianne:

Well, many of those values are just on a wall and nobody acts in accordance with them.

Luis:

Yeah, that’s true.

Dianne:

So without group behavior norms groups fail. In fact, when we go in and actually like on project teams-

Luis:

How can you enforce, I mean, enforce is a terrible word to use, but it’s the one that’s so close to me. How do you advise leaders to enforce the group behavior norms? With finding out what’s important for people and rewarding them.

Dianne:

Well, when it comes to group behavior norms, when the group creates them, they want them, the group is going to let the leader know when those norms are being violated. And when it comes to work culture, when you onboard a new employee, whether it’s virtually or whether it’s in brick and mortar, that’s where hiring the right people is important because I don’t know if you’ve ever worked in an organization where you had no clue you’re a new employee, you don’t want to upset anybody. You don’t what the group norms are.

Dianne:

You can walk from one department to another and it’s like going from Siberia to Portugal, nice warm climate, right? Where it’s just, you can’t believe how could people operate that department and it’s so nice and warm and sunny in Portugal, you’d rather be in Portugal, right? So if people understand when you onboard them, what those group behavior norms are and if people can say, I was raised in a culture where it wasn’t safe for me to disagree with leadership. I don’t know if I have the skills to do that, to be able to offer them the type of training and development that gives them the language and the skills and the self esteem and self worth that builds that communication skillset.

Luis:

All right, makes sense.

Dianne:

Because you know, like I say, when we work globally with the diversity that we have globally, it’s really understanding what’s needed to build that respect so that we’re coming from good intent and not this internally competitive. I win, you lose dynamic that quite frankly I believe restricts the earnings and organization can have.

Luis:

Right. It’s only a zero sum game if you play it that way. Right?

Dianne:

Exactly.

Luis:

Yeah. All right. You talked a bit during as you were laying down the points that people do want to build a culture virtually should keep in mind, you talked about motivating assignments and goals and what does that look like? Tell me a story about a time where you saw that done successfully.

Dianne:

When it comes to motivating assignments, people need to know. They really need to know what they are doing. Plugs into the success of the company and how the success of the company plugs back into them. So imagine a full circle. Yeah. If I am just working on, let’s say editing a video today, what is that video? And it’s laborious work. What does that video, why am I doing this video? What does it mean to the company? How will it help the company Help me. So motivating assignments come back to the employee is the reason why I am doing this. There’s a saying in the native culture here in the United States that everybody is responsible for dinner. You have the Hunter that goes out and shoots the deer. Are they the hero? No.

Luis:

Well they can’t eat it raw.

Dianne:

Exactly. The person who’s two years old and dragging a stick to the fire is just as important as that hunter. So the whole idea of what we do on teams and why we do it and what meaning it has, and how does it make the company successful so that the individual is successful is key. And I’ve been a strong believer since team dynamics are much different than a hierarchical or organization with top down directives. I’ve been a strong believer from the get go on financial rewards that are based on cost savings, bonuses or productivity bonuses, if we’re all in the boat rowing trying to get to a destination, why does the person in the back shouting row, row, row be the person who gets all the perks and rewards?

Luis:

Yeah. I was once talking with the president of a certain company and a support to use company so I could name them, but they won’t because that’s not a good thing to do. And I actually liked the guy, but we were having a funny conversation where he was telling me, Louis, I wonder what I can do to make my people happier. Maybe I can provide this, maybe I can provide a gym membership or I can get them some books or et cetera. Or let’s do, let’s do some birthday parties on the company.

Luis:

You know you should just pay them more. I’m sure they would appreciate this. Right, I’m not going to say that money is everything, but I do think that a lot of people that I talk to underestimate the motivating power of money or maybe they just want to believe that it does not as much as it should. There is some research, I know there is very famous psychological research that says that money gives you happiness and then it plateaus. But I would challenge people who come up with that excuse to realize that yes, money plateaus, happiness. But most of us have not reached that plateau.

Dianne:

Well, and especially, one of my team members is in the Philippines and when this virus started flaming I thought, I’m in the check in with all my team members. I’m going to find out how they’re doing. And so I sent her a little email and I said, just thinking of you, what’s going on in your community with this virus? And, I mean, she downloaded, she was absolutely terrified whether she or her husband would get sick and they were thinking of moving 20 miles out of town and a little cabin getting away from the city. And I said, well I just want you to know that there’s a whole bunch of work coming your way and that working from your home is probably a smarter thing.

Dianne:

And she said, Oh my gosh, you don’t know what this meant in terms of my feeling more secure. And so, you’re right, there are people around the world that haven’t reached that level of financial security where they aren’t worrying about where their next meal is going to come from, or whether they can pay their house payment or whether they can put fuel in their car or whether they can buy an electric vehicle, and get off the grid completely when it comes to, to the climate issues that we’re all dealing with. And so that’s why those conversations are important between the CEO and each employee.

Dianne:

What is important to you? Money isn’t motivating. There’s a fellow here out of Seattle, Washington state who said basically that… you were talking about Louis, about how when you reach that level, then it’s a matter of life quality more than money and the figure he came up with $75,000 a year. So if you’re answering the phones or if you’re a new employee working in the call center, you get $75,000 a year just to start and that everybody earn $75,000 a year. And that may or may not be the right number, but I think it would.

Luis:

That’s just to clarify to the listeners, that’s what that person decided on their company. Sadly not everyone who works answering the phone gets that number. Right.

Dianne:

Exactly. But you know, that was his idea and gosh, he had all sorts of reorganization that people and partners leaving and yada yada. But to make a long story short, it comes down to the conversations that you have with people, and learning what’s important And you’re right.

Luis:

The point about remote work, the location, someone in Portugal getting 75,000 a year is living like, well, I’m not going to say living like King, but they will a very comfortable life indeed. Someone when in New York we’ll be barely scrapping by.

Dianne:

Exactly. And I asked the question recently on a Facebook page I have, I said, is anybody measuring the atmospheric improvement with people not driving to work every day on the freeways?

Luis:

Oh yeah. Actually they are. It’s amazing. I saw that picture. I’ll try to find it and email you after the call, but I saw that picture like two or three days ago about, about pollution in China and in Northern Italy. And It’s cleared up like 500%. It’s amazing. It’s just sad that the circumstances that made it happen, but the actual result is pretty incredible.

Dianne:

Well as long as your remote worker understands that no, you are not lashed to the computer for 24 hours a day that you need to go out and get some exercise, go for a walk, clear your head and schedule that and you can share that schedule when you have your, what I call me time. When you’re going to be out for a life balance purpose and you negotiate that as a team, when are our critical times that we will be communicating on this project and when are you working on this time and when are we making some life quality breaks then. Then the reward of not having to drive to work every day is huge. I don’t know how it is with traffic congestion in your time, but the LA freeway, the San Francisco freeway, New York, you name it in the United States, those travel times can waste literally four hours a day of a person’s life.

Luis:

Look, it’s absolutely mind boggling to me. I’m actually spoiled. I’m so spoiled. I figured out that I’m so spoiled in being able to work from home when I had to take my brother to his work for two weeks, because he didn’t have access to a car during that time. From my place to pick him up to his work. It’s actually a 15 minute drive. I dropped him off with work that was 15 minutes of my time. I came back to my place that was an extra 15 minutes. Overall, it took off an hour of my morning and I’m like, Jesus, this is a waste of time.

Dianne:

Exactly.

Luis:

So I can only imagine how horrifying that would be if I had to make that into four hours.

Dianne:

Exactly. Going and coming. The expense on your car, the expense in your gas, the frustration, the stress, all of that is far too stressful. So there’s also the economic advantages that I think it is the learning out, what people or learning about what people really need as their rewards is also understanding what they’re not spending. As well as what they’re spending to live a comfortable life where they’re no longer in survival mode, and they can actually feel from a psychological level that they belong to something. And they belong to something that matters and has value because they understand that what they do makes the difference and how.

Luis:

So Diane, so I have a couple of questions prepared for you. I want to be respectful of your time. We’ve been going on for some 15 minutes already. I like to play a little game that I call rapid fire questions, which are very simple but somewhat sometimes unexpected questions for my guests. And I would like to know if you’re up playing it.

Dianne:

Okay, let’s play.

Luis:

Okay, so first question. What browser tabs have you opened Right now? Just you, I’m just on with you. You got my 100% attention.

Dianne:

That’s some focus. Okay.

Luis:

Second question. You have $100 to spend we each one of the people working for you. And there are two rule you can’t give them the money and you can’t ask them for what they want. So what will you buy for everyone working from you with 100 bucks per person?

Dianne:

Cell phone airtime.

Luis:

Nice. Care to explain why?

Dianne:

So I can have a conversation with them. And it does that cost them any money? They could call me, get in touch with me when they need to.

Luis:

What is the purchase and it can be more than $100. The sky is your limit on this one. What purchase have you made in the last six months or maybe a year that has improved your work life or productivity?

Dianne:

Whiteboard.

Luis:

Whiteboard What do you use your whiteboard for?

Dianne:

To illustrate examples for the team.

Luis:

Okay. Any favorite brand of whiteboard or is there any whiteboard

Dianne:

Well, actually where we’re looking at a new one. It’s a lot more expensive than what we’re looking at now because what we want to do is play our TIGER’S team wheel game, which is a face to face game, but we want to do it virtually to help people develop their group behavior norms.

Luis:

Nice. Okay. Daily routine and you can just be work-related. No need to get into your personal time. But daily work routine from morning to evening. What does it look?

Dianne:

Well first thing I scan my email, find out what’s important, what I’m going to do later. And then I have team communications that I do just in terms of making sure that the goals understood what we’re doing, and then I take time to exercise and listen to podcasts because my learning is extremely important to me. Then I download podcasts and just sitting and listening to them makes no sense. So then I get my heart going, my brain going, my body going and listen to podcasts. Then I’m working on my own projects and checking to see if anybody needs to talk to me. And then by the end of the day, I am ready for my personal time. In terms of working late at night, if it’s a really critical thing, like right now the virus is critical for the team and so there are communications that might occur after what I consider my time to myself. But that’s rare. I just don’t believe in working any more than eight hours a day with breaks.

Luis:

So a team member needs your feedback or input in a project. Do you prefer to give it in writing or call them into a call and why?

Dianne:

Any anytime I can talk to somebody. I would rather do that than write extensive email because that just takes up everybody’s time.

Luis:

Okay. Interesting answer. Never that answer before. I’m going to think about that. So nice. What books do you recommend or if you don’t recommend books have resonated with you?

Dianne:

Did I bring this book in here? I did. I’m going to grab it.

Luis:

By the way your book can qualify.

Dianne:

No. Do you see this?

Luis:

Well I see, but the listeners don’t because they are listeners. Kindly read it to use what it is okay.

Dianne:

So it’s Lisa See’s book from Korea and it’s called The Island of Sea Women. And I love this book because these women were number one amazing. I mean they could dive in cotton clothing off of Russia to harvest Sea, I mean not only are they physiologically amazing, they’re a dying culture, but it really teaches in my view, the importance of having, whether it’s working virtually or working in the office space itself. I believe that it’s extremely important to have a buddy and I believe that that person who problem solves with you should be completely different from you.

Dianne:

For example the person that I like to problem solve with on my team is a financial person who is scientifically accurate on everything and who doesn’t like to take risks? This is as an entrepreneur, my makeup is, I will take risks. And so when I want to problem solve somebody with somebody, I’m going to ask, here’s the idea, how can this fail? And I had to teach her because she is one of these people who believe that if I’m the tallest blade of grass, I’m going to get mowed down. And so I had to teach her that to trust me that I wasn’t going to hack her head off if she told me something I didn’t want to hear.

Dianne:

And now we have this very respectfully sincere frank and forthright problem solving that is… I just totally value her and when she has to create something, she’s asking me and so it’s like we’ve got the whole brain going between the two of us. So this Lisa See’s book, the Island of Sea Women really speaks to how important that buddy process is. How do you build your team and how important to your survival I think of as human being is talking to somebody who is completely different in how they see the world than you do.

Luis:

All right. That’s a great recommendation. Thank you so much for sharing.

Dianne:

Yeah. It’s a great book. It’s wonderful. And I’m sure knowing Lisa See it’s in many languages.

Luis:

Okay. Final question. This is the one that everyone gets. You are hosting a dinner with the top tech companies from all over the world. People attending are important decision makers, CTOs, CEOs, et cetera. And the round table in the dinner is about remote work and the future of work. Now the twist here is that it’s held in a Chinese restaurant. And I know for everyone listening to me, I should have dropped the Chinese restaurant question, but it’s been here since podcast one. I love Chinese food. I am not compromising. So because it’s on a Chinese restaurant, everyone gets a fortune cookie and you as the host get to decide the message inside the fortune cookie. So what message will it be?

Dianne:

Great question. When we win, I win.

Luis:

When we win, I win. Was that it?

Dianne:

Yeah.

Luis:

Did I get it right? Wow. That is a good thing to go inside the fortune cookie. I like it.

Dianne:

Well, when we win I win. So it’s like if we’re going to collaborate, we’re going to come to something that’s going to change the world. We all win, don’t we?

Luis:

That’s is absolutely correct. Dianne, thank you so much for being-

Dianne:

And I’d also tell the Chinese company not to serve pork.

Luis:

Sure. I’m not sure if they can, I kind of like pork but, I kind of like the sour sweet pork is so good. Why would you want to serve the sour sweet pork?

Dianne:

Because there are people in the world who might be at that conference that would be extremely insulted by receiving pork.

Luis:

You might be more culturally sensible than me. I’ll definitely take your advice on that, but I will still secretly order the sour sweet pork myself.

Dianne:

Absolutely.

Luis:

Anyway, Dianne, it’s been a pleasure. When our listeners want to continue the conversation with you, learn more about TIGERS, learn more about your upcoming book, et cetera, et cetera, where can they continue the conversation with you? Where can they find all the information that they need?

Dianne:

Well, they can go to our main company website at Core Values, C. O. R. E. V. A. L. U. E. S dot com. And if they would’ve flipp through the new book that’s coming up so they can just see, I believe that people should be able to, whether it’s virtually or otherwise, be able to pick up a book and maybe thumb through the pages. I created that opportunity on the books preview website, which is Becoming TIGERS B. E. C. O. M. I. N. G. T. I. G. E. R. S dot com.0

Luis:

We will include all those links and titles on the show notes by the way, so people can go back there and see them. It was an absolute pleasure. Dianne. Thank you for coming.

Dianne:

You’re very welcome. Thank you for having me. It’s a conversation that I believe is absolutely critical and it was delight that your company reached out.

Luis:

Yeah. And I will definitely reach out because I didn’t get to ask half of the questions that I wanted to ask, so I will definitely invite you for a round two closer to the release of the book.

Dianne:

That would be wonderful. I’d be delighted.

Luis:

Thank you. So ladies and gentlemen, this was Dianne Crampton, the founder of the management consulting company, TIGERS and the and the writer of the upcoming book Becoming TIGERS Leading Your Team to Success. I was your usual host Louis from the DistantJob Podcast. If you enjoyed this conversation, please make sure to check out Dianne on several things. You can find them on the show notes and subscribe. Don’t forget to subscribe. And if you really enjoy the podcast, don’t forget to leave us a review on iTunes. That’s the way that the podcast can grow and I can get even more awesome guests. So thank you for that. See you all next week.

Luis:

And so we close another episode of the DistantJob Podcast. And if you enjoyed the episode, please, you can help us out by sharing it on social media. That will be great. It’s how we reach more listeners and the more listeners we have, the more awesome guests I can get in touch and convinced to participate in these conversations that are a joy to have for me and I hope a joy for you listen to as well.

Luis:

You can also help a lot leaving reviews on iTunes or your podcast syndication service of choice, reviews are surprisingly helpful in helping the podcast gets to have more listeners. Now, another thing that you might want to do is go to distant job.com/blog/podcast click on the your favorite episode and any episode really and subscribe, by subscribing you will get a notification whenever a new episode is up and whenever we get the transcripts off the episode up so you can actually peruse the conversations in text form.

Luis:

And of course, if you need to find a great employee for your team a great remote employee, you should take the whole world into consideration and not just look to hire locally, not just look to hire in your country. Look around the world because that’s the talent that contains the best talent. And to help you with that again distantjob.com is the perfect place to start you will tell us who we need and we will make sure that you get the best possible candidate. See you next week on the next episode of the DistantJob Podcast.

More ways to listen:

One of the main keys to remote success is creating the right culture for your company. Culture is more than values and objectives; it is also about leaders being able to inspire and connect with their teams.

In this episode, Dianne Crampton shares her experience in building remote cultures and reveals the tringle for business success: Roles, Goals, and Relationships. She explains why having the ability to work with companies and people all around the world is necessary during these times:

''If you work in a global capacity with companies all around the world, being able to understand humans and how we interact and what we actually can create with our geniuses is the driving force.'' Click To Tweet

What you will learn:

  • How to build a culture remotely  
  • Six principles teams need to stick on  
  • How to build strong relationships with your team 
  • Why some leaders fail and how to avoid their mistakes
  • Keys to efficient remote management
  • How to measure cultural goals
  • Establishing group behavior norms

 

Book recommendations:

 

This interview is part of the DistantJob podcast. To hear more from leaders and successful entrepreneurs on how to build and lead winning teams, check us out on Anchor.fm and on our website.

Don’t forget to SUBSCRIBE so you won’t miss all of the other interesting episodes that we have coming up in the next few weeks!

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