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Hiring for Culture Fit in a Remote Context with Mag Boron

Mag is the founder and CEO of Pangian, the fastest-growing remote work community around the world. Mag’s career spans over 10 years of global leadership and remote work expertise, deployed in complex business and technology strategies, with over 10 million U.S. dollars in impact across the aerospace, retail, and financial industries on a global scale. She specializes in hiring for startups and Fortune 500 companies to develop high-performance global remote teams.

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Luís:

Welcome ladies and gentlemen to the DistantJob Podcast. This is your host, Luís. And with me today, I have Mag Boron. Meg is the founder and CEO of Pangian, the fastest growing remote work community around the world, Mag’s career spans over 10 years of global leadership and remote work expertise, deployed in complex business and technology strategies, with over 10 million U.S. dollars in impact across the aerospace, retail, and financial industries on a global scale. She specializes in hiring for startups and Fortune 500 companies with a focus on developing high performance global remote teams. She’s a work-life balance enthusiastic, an international speaker and other, and a lot of other things that we’ll certainly go through the conversation. Mag, it’s awesome to have you, you have a huge CV. What did I miss?

Mag Boron:

I think you’ve covered it all. I think that’s the most important, I think from everything that you said, the biggest thing for me is my passion for people around the world for empowering every single human being in the world to really find their dream remote career and have that freedom and flexibility of working remotely from anywhere. That’s the dream.

Luís:

Nice. Yeah, that’s a big dream and it’s something that some people have been forced into that dream due to the current circumstances in the world. So we should talk a bit about that, how that plays out. But first, tell me a bit about Pangian and tell me about how … Well I usually ask people how remote work has made the business possible, but this company is actually built entirely around remote work. So why don’t you tell me about the idea? You’re the founder, so how was this idea born?

Mag Boron:

Wow, it’s actually a very interesting and long story. I think, as opposed to maybe any other business person or a founder or CEO, I didn’t wake up one day with an idea, “Let me create a company. Let me create Pangian.” It just happened over time. And really, the story goes, pretty much all the way to the beginning, I think when I was about five years old, growing up in a small town in Poland, I remember I always had one dream. And the dream was, I want to travel the world and I want to meet people from around the world. That was the dream. But I grew up at the end of communists, the borders were closed. We didn’t have passports. Literally everyone told me, “Mag, this is not going to be possible.” But I never believed it. I always felt like a global citizen.

Mag Boron:

My favorite games when I was little was playing a guessing game or which country that is or which language that is, or which flag that is. So that was the dream. And as soon as communist collapse, I was the first one with the passport in my hand, heading up, driving all over Europe, really meeting people from all over the continent. And one thing I realized very quickly, that Europe was so diverse and so amazing and languages were switching each time we’re crossing the border, but there was one common denominator how to communicate with all those people. And that was English language. It was impossible at that time for me to speak different languages to connect with different people. But if I knew how to speak English, I would make it happen. And that’s kind of sprang the idea of coming to United States to learn English. I spent few years, not only learning English, but also going to college.

Mag Boron:

And immediately out of college I got recruited by Honeywell Aerospace, a global company. And initially it was at a position in the office, but I quickly realized that I worked already with people on four different continents. And most of our work was done on the laptop. And that was the kind of eye-opening moment that we can communicate electronically. And I immediately started working remotely. So I work and manage those multimillion dollar programs 100% remotely. I love every single moment of it. I love the flexibility. I love the fact that in the morning I don’t have to be in the car. Instead I can do a run around the neighborhood. In the evening I can right away start meeting my friends instead of driving back home. It was amazing. So as my career progressed, I started traveling around the world. And every time I talked to somebody, they were just, “Mag, we want to do what you do.”

Mag Boron:

So I created my first Facebook group. I had maybe a 100 people in the group. And then before I knew it people started adding each other to the group. Before I knew it was like 3,000 people and more, and that’s where I felt like this is a moment. This is bigger than me. We have to do something about it. I want to create that community to empower everyone to have that remote work, remote career. Keep growing that, keep enhancing their life and the name that absolutely kind of boost perfect position for what I’ve always wanted to achieve was Pangian. Which is a global citizen of that supercontinent of Pangaea that brings now everyone together.

Luís:

All right. So that’s an awesome story, but I want to dive a bit deeper into your personal productivity function. Because when I was gathering my notes for this interview, I looked at a lot of your material and your CV and all of that. And it does say that you are an advocate for remote and a balanced lifestyle, right? You’re a big deal on the balanced lifestyle and traveling and all of that. But you also have built a company. You have a B.S. summa cum laude in business and information technology from the North Carolina State University. You have multiple certifications and Sigma and other stuff. And I’m like, “When I finished my work day, my remote work day, I’m ready to lie on the couch and fall asleep.” So how do you actually manage to have a balanced lifestyle while building all of this, while building your personal portfolio like this. Because it’s not like you only build a business, you also are constantly learning. And then you say that you travel and that’s … How do you disengage from work and re-center and start something else? Right.

Mag Boron:

Great question. Luís. And I have to tell you that this was actually one of the moments in my career that I had the moment where I was completely overdoing it. And I fear that a lot of remote workers, I think from employer side employers are worrying that remote workers will not be productive, but opposite is true. Because remote workers are at home and that work is right there, they tend to spend way more time working and actually overworking. And I had that moment in time and I realized that if I’m doing this, I have to be absolutely happy.

Mag Boron:

It has to drive my job satisfaction. And the discipline, the same discipline that I applied to actual creating my career, I have to apply exactly the same discipline to creating my work-life balance. So for me, I created literally a schedule of when I work, when I’m not working, and made it non-negotiable. To make sure that when I’m not working, I’m fully doing what I love, whether it’s traveling or meeting with friends or just doing hobbies, simple stuff that make us really happy. So when I come back the next day or the next week to work, I’m fully energized. So for me, it’s all about that discipline, really setting that on your schedule and not diverting from it at all.

Luís:

Well, I guess that’s a good segue into, tell me a bit about, I mean, you have a team, you manage a team, obviously. I’m sure you have a lot of direct reports, you don’t manage your company, not everyone reports directly to you. So why don’t you tell me about how many direct reports you are and how do you manage them on a daily basis? What does your day look like? And, if we take the bird’s eye view, then what does your week look like when managing your remote team, when managing your remote business?

Mag Boron:

I think my entire philosophy for Pangian, so Pangian, is still growing. It’s still relatively small for what we are managing, we have now over 10 people full-time working on daily operation. But for me, my entire philosophy of work is really hiring the best people who are truly passionate about their jobs. The minute that happens, not only the individual person is super happy about what they’re doing, but also it doesn’t require any kind of micromanagement and allows that flexibility for everybody to really fully contribute.

Mag Boron:

So I will say that I don’t spend too much time managing my team. It’s more of a collaboration. So like we start the day with check-ins, we use Slack for check-ins for our team, but other than that we all have our set responsibilities. And I think everybody fully owns those responsibilities and executes. And we try to work, because remote work allows that freedom and flexibility, we want to make sure that we truly leverage that and we try to work in a synchronous mode as much as possible. So we don’t require our team to be present at this specific hour for this specific meeting all the time, but if a lot of the work can be done at the person specific ideal time, that’s perfect. What we care about is the results. So every single thing that we do is some kind of a final effect. We look at that more so than the actual effort that got put in.

Luís:

Okay, interesting. And how does that fold away? Is like the week is a repeat of that structure?

Mag Boron:

Yes, exactly. So for example, as part of Pangian we have employers, we have candidates joining in the remote work community. We have community managers, we have our marketing team and everybody has their own tasks. And we’re just simply reporting on the tasks that we have completed for the day, for the week. We look at the results and of course we have on the Slack communication channel. Well, if anybody’s facing any challenges, that’s when we can connect. And that’s where we can jump in to really help each other. But other than that, we try to be as kind of individual and independent as possible. So everybody can truly kind of use their top strengths and top skills to really deliver their best product.

Luís:

Okay, cool. So let’s actually drill a bit deeper into that skill part. So you specialize in hiring for startups and Fortune 500. That’s actually that’s something that’s very near and dear to DistantJob as well, because we are recruiters. We are a recruitment agency, that’s our specialty. And what we found out is that as we are exclusively remote, so we help people hire exclusively remote employees. And what we found out, is that the skillset, the technical skillset is only a part of it. You can get the person that’s genius level on all the required skills for them to be a good professional, but they need to have a separate set of skills, right? For being also great at working remotely. So, I’m wondering, what key principles do you look for? What do you think makes a great professional also be great at working remotely?

Mag Boron:

Great question. And for us that was always kind of like a premise of why we started Pangian. Because as I was working remotely prior to developing Pangian, one think managing those teams on four different continents, all of us remote, coming from all kinds of different cultures, with different languages, right? Different working styles. One of the things that was clear is exactly what you mentioned, that skills by itself don’t create the best performance or the best job satisfaction. There has to be that cultural fit or cultural app that we are looking for.

Mag Boron:

And for me, I always start with a company, because each company is so much different. So I always want to learn what is the culture of the company at the employer side first? What is this employer looking for? Because they could be employers that are very much structured and they like that routine and structure. And it could be employers that are free going, and there is like a lot of creativity, and things happen on the spot. And really looking for the match of a candidate to that company culture. So it’s very kind of authentic and really natural that nothing is being forced, and that’s what we are looking for. So we’re looking for that kind of between candidate and an employer, that much of their own personal styles and their strengths of what they naturally gravitate to.

Luís:

Yeah. What makes a person, like you said, you started off saying that you want people that you don’t necessarily have to direct, but people who know what they need to do, right? People who, in some way self-manage, what is the X factor there? What is the thing to look for when you’re interviewing those people or when you’re looking for those people?

Mag Boron:

Got it. So I start with skillsets. So obviously if a person has specific level of expertise of what they are doing on a task level, they will be able to perform it themselves. I think if that expertise is not present to begin with, it will be difficult to function on your own because that’s where you need a lot of help, right? So we start with that first expertise. We talk a lot about results, not just the tasks that we perform every day. But when we talk to candidates, especially this is what I teach in my remote work Academy. That’s what I teach our candidates that are going from step to step. As they’re applying for the jobs, how to land those jobs quicker and more efficient. I’m teaching results, right? So number one, everything that we do at work is results. So we ask for those kind of questions at the interview stage, we look for this kind of evidence in the Pangian profile.

Mag Boron:

So each candidate in our network has a profile that is divided into two parts. One is like a resume part. So your traditional elements like your experience and skills and education, the second part is all about your personality. So what is naturally that you gravitate to, what kind of work style, what are your hobbies? What are the industries that you are feeling passionate about? So we check first the results, and once we understand the results, then we look for those cultural art, cultural fit.

Mag Boron:

Meaning, if I’m naturally interested in travel, I would love to work with companies that are connected with that industry. And automatically when I’m connected with something that makes me alive, passionate, just bubbling, ready to wake up in the morning and do it again, there is more potential of being super independent and really driving your own work. Versus falling into jobs and industries that maybe we’re not so passionate about. For me, I’ve always been very squeamish about anything medical. A medical thing is not my thing. So I think I would not be best candidate, but looking for candidates who are passionate about helping others, especially with their health issues, that will be our kind of goal there. So we look on that fit on every single level.

Luís:

Okay. So, let’s go back a bit to you creating Pangian. What is something that surprised you about remote work? What is something that you thought was going to happen, or that wasn’t going to happen before you started, that after you working with Pangian for some time you realize that actually you got it wrong and it was the other way around?

Mag Boron:

So I think the biggest thing, when I first started Pangian is really to help people who I was meeting on my way, people around the world who had so much potential and really wanted that freedom. My goal was to help them find those best remote jobs. That was the goal. That’s why I created Facebook book. But I learned within the first six months that while that was that initial need, what people really wanted is that network, is that group of connections and friends there, where they can feel that they’re supported, and they have a system where they can always go back to and do stuff that we normally talk about afterward. Or maybe water cooler situation, you know talk about, “Here are my pets. Here is the places that I like to go to. Here are the things I like to do.” And when you’re talking about our hobbies and passions and our families and our lifestyle. So I think that was the most surprising that instead of just a job, I think we all need that job as the first one, but really community as like the biggest factor ever.

Luís:

All right, nice. So, let’s dive in a bit deeper about your own work style and the way you find to get yourself productive in doing all of this. So in the morning, assuming you start working in the morning, might not be the case. But when you open up your browser, what are the tabs that are there? Or apps, if you don’t base your work, your virtual office on the browser, what are the apps that you always open up first thing in the day?

Mag Boron:

Great question. So I’m actually a dual person, so I’m both on the browser and on the mobile, I use both. Definitely Pangian. Pangian is number one. I always join the community. I see what new jobs we have, that’s when I start my day. The second tab is always open Slack. So on Slack we’re always with our team, this is our number one communication. So, that’s where I get the latest information of where maybe somebody needs help, or we need to communicate. The next two tabs are all about, like you mentioned effectiveness and project management tools. So Trello we are using for very simple kind of tasks that it’s very easy to manage. And Asana is my really go-to project management tool. That’s where we manage all our projects virtually. That’s where the entire team is. That’s where we communicate. And the final tool is actually a social media tool, it’s Facebook.

Mag Boron:

That’s where we have our community on Facebook. Both our open community to Pangian’s around the world. And that’s where I manage my private community for Pangian’s who are part of our remote work Academy, who are really getting that step by step support from maybe transitioning from the office or maybe they had situation when they’re applying for remote jobs and really not coming back, not getting those results. We are then sitting down with those candidates and taking them step by step throughout the process of effectively applying for those jobs and landing their dream jobs.

Luís:

Nice. Nice, nice. Okay. So amidst all of this, where do you find your creative space, your brainstorming space coming with new ways to make the business grow? Tell me about shower ideas.

Mag Boron:

You see, this is fantastic, because I think I have webpage with my bio and specifically talk about this amazing phenomenon of all those ideas in the shower. And I still have them, but because of remote work, I learned something about myself. Remote work allowed me to start creating environments and be in environments that would get me inspired. So for example, right now, I’m not in San Francisco, I’m on the East Coast in Asheville, North Carolina in the middle of Blue Ridge Mountains. And literally these are the moments that get me inspired. That’s when I have all those ideas popping up. Just looking at the mountains and really disconnecting from what I do every day, to gain that perspective. I think sometimes we feel like if we push a little harder, if we spend one more hour on work, all of a sudden we’re going to solve all those problems.

Mag Boron:

But I found it opposite for me is when I disconnect, when I put myself in environments of beautiful mountains, of beautiful ocean, or even just spending time laughing with friends. All of a sudden, fully refreshed, I come back and boom, that’s where everything happens. So what I do with remote work, I try to actively and with very disciplined way create kind of those environments. One of those, I know you are in Portugal right now, was I think a year or two years ago, I spent about two months in Lisbon really connecting with everyone-

Luís:

Oh, nice.

Mag Boron:

… seeing the beautiful landscapes in your country. So that’s part of what I do.

Luís:

Well, you should come back, you should come back so we can meet.

Mag Boron:

For sure.

Luís:

Once travel is something good to do again.

Mag Boron:

For sure.

Luís:

All right. So if you had $100 to spend with each person working for you, what would you give them? And there are a couple of rules. You can’t just give them the money or cheat by giving them an Amazon gift card or similar. You need to buy the same thing for everyone. Could be software, could be hardware, could be an experience, whatever, but it needs to be the same thing.

Mag Boron:

Okay. So I know exactly what I would do. Few years ago when I was still working at Wells Fargo, which is one of the biggest banks here in the United States. I had a mentor and this mentor told me about platinum rule. And the platinum rule says that when you’re treating others, don’t treat them the way you want to be treated, but treat them the way they want to be treated. So that’s my platinum rule. So what I would do, I would meet with every single person and find out exactly what their passion is, if I don’t know it yet. And I would give them a gift that is completely related to something that gets them excited about life.

Mag Boron:

So for example, our CTO is truly obsessed with open source technology, with newest technology. So that would be something definitely like a newest technology piece. We have one of our amazing members in customer service that is absolutely loves volley ball. So there could be something with volleyball and sports, and I will be really drilling down to something that I want to see that spark. When I give that gift, I want to see that spark and excitement and the person is completely on fire, ready to go with their passion.

Luís:

Well, I get it, but let’s say some people who will listen to this podcast, they’re VPs or presidents at companies with 200 employees. Now that approach is very hard to scale. Not saying it’s not possible. They could make it their mission for the next year, but at some point you can’t scale that, right? So what would you do if you needed to scale?

Mag Boron:

I would definitely scale it. While not easy I think it’s absolutely worth doing. I’m a big fan of Gary V and I think that’s one of the things that he talks about really kind of, even as you scale organization from, one, 10, 100 to even 1,000 people, trying to create that culture. And I think as long as we keep propagating that culture through our direct hires, and then each person had their own employees, all departments, and making sure that we understand that. That this is a regular subject of conversation that we understand who we are and keep asking those questions, right? So make sure that we are actively asking how the passion is changing, how the hobbies is changing. That would be my number one goal. I want to build organization where we know who you are. We really celebrate our uniqueness and individuality. And that will be my goal.

Luís:

All right. So about yourself, what purchase has made your work life easier or more productive in the past? Let’s say one year, six months.

Mag Boron:

Do you mean like tools or anything else-

Luís:

Whatever. Something that you spend money on the last six months to a year that made your work life better or more productive or more balanced or whatever metric you care to look at right now.

Mag Boron:

I would say Asana. Asana is a project management tool. We invested a little bit of funds there, but it was absolutely life changing. Our entire team is in Asana. That’s how we manage our projects. It makes communication on task for project so much easy. It’s absolutely amazing. And I would say my laptop. So I invested in a laptop that is super, super, super thin, super, super light. So whenever I move around, it’s so easy to put in my laptop bag and it just takes no time to kind of set it up everywhere. I think these are the two things that I just absolutely cherish. I cannot live without.

Luís:

What brand is the laptop?

Mag Boron:

The laptop is a standard Asus, but its one of those new technologies that is super, super thin.

Luís:

Got it. Got it, got it, got it. So I have a suggestion for you actually. Get some AquaNotes.

Mag Boron:

Okay. Tell me a little bit about the product.

Luís:

AquaNotes yeah, it’s very simple. It’s Post-it Notes that are waterproof. You put the block on your shower, it comes with a waterproof pencil and you can note your idea, your shower ideas.

Mag Boron:

Wow. That’s something that’s definitely worth checking.

Luís:

Yes, exactly.

Mag Boron:

Love it.

Luís:

Exactly. So I’m not sponsored by them by the way. But I thought after you mentioned that I thought it was worth bringing it to your attention. So let’s talk a bit about books. What book you talked a bit about Gary V, what book or books have you gifted the most?

Mag Boron:

So the book that, let me just pull up the title. I want to make sure that I remember the title correctly, and this is the book that I recommend the most in our community. Give me just one second. I’m going to go to my selections and I’m going to pull it out. And it’s that amazing book about discovering your passion and building your career. It’s not specifically geared towards remote work per se, but honestly, there are lessons mentioned there, it could be applied 100% to remote work. And I actually refer to those lessons very often when teaching by Academy and really motivating our team members.

Mag Boron:

So the first book is from Ken Robinson and it’s called, The Element. And really it’s about those moments. And I think those moments happen, when we are finishing maybe high school or college, and we’re kind of lost, not sure which career path to take, but then they also happen later on in life. Some times we have five or 10, or even 15 years of experience, and we felt like we’ve accomplished everything kind of what we wanted, but now we feel stuck that there’s something else that we need to do. And this book, The Element is super, super powerful. So definitely recommend that book. The 4-Hour Workweek, amazing book by Tim Ferriss about really delegating, that will be my second recommendation.

Luís:

Nice, great recommendation. So thank you. So let’s go into the final question. The final question requires a bit more of a setup. So please bear with me. Let’s say that you are hosting a dinner and attending this dinner are going to be the top people in tech companies from all around the world, CEO, CTOs, hiring managers, HR directors. And the twist is that there’s going to be a round table about remote work and the future of work during the dinner and it’s happening in a Chinese restaurant. So you as the host, get to choose the message that comes inside the fortune cookie. So obviously it needs to be non-promotional, but what is the message that you’re going to give to these people? What is the fortune cookie message that they will crack open once they get their fortune cookies?

Mag Boron:

Wow. What an interesting question. I would say I literally would like to take a week or month to really keep thinking about it because the opportunity is so big. But I think if I can do it on the spot, I think the message would be aligned with my mission in life, which is empowering every single person in the world to really realize they can accomplish anything they put their mind to. And my message to those top tech people in the world. Maybe Jeff Bezos, that’ll be amazing if he was at the table.

Luís:

Well, Jeff, I hope you’re listening to the podcast. You know, if you do, if Amazon needs a new hiring manager, let me know. If you need a new marketing person, let me know. So-

Mag Boron:

Exactly, Jeff, if you are listening.

Luís:

Yes, exactly.

Mag Boron:

I am truly inspired by Amazon. I mean, they truly changed the way we do life, the convenience the one click delivery-

Luís:

I’m pretty sure that I fully paid for one off Jeff Bezos’ houses, by now, right? Just off the amount of stuff that I got from Amazon. I’m pretty sure that one of those houses has been paid by me, so.

Mag Boron:

I think we all have similar stories, but it’s just like really helping our lives. Similarly, like remote work, saves time from us driving, right? Same thing with delivery, right? It’s the time that we’re not spending driving around looking for the product. We can do it with couple clicks, but if I could send that message would be, how can we team up? How can those top powerful people in the world, especially in technology, team up to create more systems, more opportunities to really empower people around the world, especially in the regions that normally don’t have opportunity for that empowerment.

Mag Boron:

Because that’s my mission. You know, I grew up in a small town in Poland. We didn’t have big companies in my town. At that time without remote work, there was no opportunity for me to start getting mentorships or job opportunities or salaries or growth opportunities from amazing leaders and amazing companies. And that’s what remote work allows us to do right now. So I would really challenge those leaders to how can we come up with more systems, maybe educational systems, where we can, especially with the power of technology and internet, we can keep educating and helping and empowering people in the regions where there are no opportunities or they are far in between.

Luís:

I absolutely agree. That’s part of our philosophy as well. We think that’s where true diversity shows up, because if you get people that are multicultural, not just from the multiple countries that exist inside of a big country such as the U.S., but actually the cultures, multicultural people that come from all around the world. That’s really how you get through diversity. And at the same time, that’s also how you diminish the bigger forms of inequity around the world is by providing people that are, let’s say in a small village, in a former communist country, with the possibility of really applying their talents that could be world-class to businesses that would normally not have access to them. So, that’s definitely part of the mission of DistantJob. And I think that we overlap there as well.

Mag Boron:

Absolutely. I think there’s just so many synergies between Pangian and DistantJobs. I cannot wait for future opportunities to collaborate and keep working together to bring that mission to life.

Luís:

Well, we certainly will. We’ll talk about that. But right now, in case our listeners want to learn more about you, more about Pangian, continue the conversation with you, tell them, where can they find them? Where can they find you? Where can they learn more about Pangian and what nice project should they check out?

Mag Boron:

So definitely joining Pangian, we’re at Pangian.com, the main domain. Joining our community. Number one joining, if you’re looking for remote jobs, fully remote, we’re specializing in bringing top remote opportunities, fully verified and reputable companies all fully checked. So looking for a remote job is much easier, much more assured in landing those jobs. Then the second thing is our community. So going to pangian.com you are going to see a section community, really joining that community. Connecting with other Pangian’s around the world is really powerful. Once you join our network, you’re going to also get access to our Facebook group. We are very active on social media. That’s where Pangian’s … We have now Pangian’s over 100,000 Pangian’s from 121 countries in the world, it’s happening. I cannot believe every day when I opened my laptop. People from around the world really kind of propelling this mission.

Mag Boron:

And these are high caliber candidates coming from companies like Facebook and Apple and Salesforce. So really, really great diverse thinkers and innovators in the world already on Pangian. So joining that, and if you are new to remote work, or maybe you’ve been there for a while and you are having trouble really to understand this market and see how it’s changing and maybe landing those remote jobs, you may be applying for remote positions, but you not hearing back or potentially even getting rejection emails. We have entire training system. It’s called Pangian remote work Academy. pangian/academy. We run it every few months. So make sure that if it’s not open right now, make sure that you sign up for the waiting list. And that’s where I teach you personally, step-by-step every single thing that I’ve learned to land those remote jobs at remote companies. And now every single step that I’m using as a recruiter on the other side, to make sure that your process is smooth and your process is easy and you don’t have to struggle the way I did in the very beginning.

Luís:

Nice. Sounds awesome. I hope people will check it out. We will include the links in the show notes. So thank you so much. Thank you so much for being here, Mag. It was a blast. I had a blast. Thank you for being a guest.

Mag Boron:

Thank you so much, Luis for inviting me and thank you for everything that you do with DistantJobs, especially there in Portugal. Propelling this mission of remote work and empowering people around the world to have that opportunity with remote work and helping employers get great candidates. So thank you for your work as well.

Luís:

Thank you. And thank you as well. Ladies and gentleman, this was Mag Boron from Pangian, and I am Louis from DistantJob, and DistantJob podcast. The podcast about helping you build and lead awesome remote teams. See you next week.

Luís:

So we closed another episode of the DistantJob podcast. And if you enjoyed the episode, please, you can help us out by sharing it on social media. That would be great. It’s how we reach more listeners. And the more listeners we have, the more awesome guests I can get in touch and convinced to participate in these conversations that are a joy to have for me. And I hope they’re a joy for you to listen to as well. You can also help a lot leaving reviews on iTunes or your podcast syndication service of choice. Reviews are surprisingly helpful in helping the podcast get to have more listeners. Now, another thing that you might want to do is go to distantjob.com/blog/podcast. Click on your favorite episode, any episode really, and subscribe. By subscribing you will get a notification whenever a new episode is up and whenever we get the transcripts of the episode up, so you can actually peruse the conversations in text form.

Luís:

And of course, if you need to find a great employee for your team, a great remote employee. You should take the whole world into consideration and not just look to hire locally, not just look to hire in your country. Look around the whole world ,because that’s the talent pool that contains the best talent. And to help you with that, again, distantjob.com is the perfect place to start. You will tell us who we need, and we will make sure that you get the best possible candidate, 40% faster than the industry standard. And with that a bid you adieu.

 

More ways to listen:

Hiring and recruiting talented candidates is a challenge for many companies. Hard skills matter, but other aspects are equally important.

During this enriching podcast episode, Mag Boron shares why all employers and managers need to look for culture fit and passion when hiring remote employees. She also reveals tips and strategies for maintaining a healthy work-life balance.

''My entire philosophy of work is really hiring the best people who are truly passionate about their jobs.'' Click To Tweet

Highlights:

  • Mag’s story about founding Pangian
  • Tips for having a balanced lifestyle while being a remote worker
  • Why hiring passionate people is a must
  • Key principles to look for when hiring remote employees
  • Why culture matters when hiring employees

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Don’t forget to SUBSCRIBE so you won’t miss all of the other interesting episodes that we have coming up in the next few weeks!