How Communication Keeps Evolving in Remote Teams, with Tyler Sellhorn

Gabriela Molina

Tyler Sellhorn is the Head of Customer Experience at Yac. Yac is an asynchronous messaging platform that helps you eliminate meetings with voice messages. They’re about asynchronous meetings, voice messaging, and screen sharing for teams.

Remote work leader

Read the transcript

Luis:

Welcome ladies and gentlemen, to another episode of the DistantJob Podcast, your podcast about building and leading awesome remote teams. So I’m Luis your host, as usual. And today my guest is Tyler Sellhorn. Tyler is the head of customer experience at Yac and Yac is what helps you eliminate meetings with voice messages. They’re about asynchronous meeting, voice messaging and screen sharing for teams. So Tyler, welcome to the show.

Tyler Sellhorn:

Hello, Luis. Thanks for having me on the show. Thank you for featuring me, featuring us, super excited to be talking about building and leading awesome remote teams with you. Those are things that I’m super passionate about. I’m also a podcaster myself and really, really excited about appearing here and just jamming on stuff that I love talking about.

Luis:

Yeah, for sure. And of course everything will be in the show notes so people can find your podcast, people can find how to go to Yac et cetera, just check the show notes below. But for now, I want to start by asking you, how did you first intersect with remote work and how has it influenced your career?

Tyler Sellhorn:

So I started exploring remote work early on in 2019. I was finishing an educational leadership masters thinking that once upon a time I was a technology oriented teacher and I made this pivot when I was struggling to be selected for the next thing in my education career, the intermediate steps were not available to me to those next roles that I was thinking of. So I made the pivot to being a teaching oriented technologist.

Tyler Sellhorn:

And so I started looking at customer facing roles in technology companies, including studying for Salesforce administration certification and some of those other types of roles that are very often done in a remote setting. And then I found customer success and I got a job at a B2B SaaS company in their customer success department. I had originally applied for a leadership position but was offered an individual contributor role. And inside of six months, I got promoted to lead that function as well as the support function. It really just took off from there. I really I’m just so grateful for folks like yourself, Luis and others that have been these, so to speak, astronauts of remote work that have been leading the way and showing us how to do this thing well, and showing us how to do it in a way that is successful and sustainable and something that we can do in the long term, right? Those 2019 remoters. I like to say, that have been so generous with their knowledge and their time, here during the pandemic. So, yeah, I just want to say, thank you.

Luis:

Hey, no problem. You’re doing some of that yourself now. It’s a great community, right? And it’s a very generous community. And again, this podcast exists because of people that have been doing remote for many years that are willing to talk about it and talk about their processes with others. That’s really the entire point of this podcast, right? To give people that have been doing this and that can share their knowledge with others, there’s a platform. So, absolutely. I understand you. When you started that, when you gave that step to go into remote, what was it like? What matched your expectations and what didn’t match your expectations in what way?

Tyler Sellhorn:

So, one of the things that was most important to me as I did the next thing was that I was going to be located here. I’m speaking to you from Fort Wayne, Indiana. This is the, don’t be creepy. This is the post-industrial Midwest, we’re about equidistant from Indianapolis, Chicago, Detroit, Columbus. Those are large cities here in the Midwest. We’re a educational and healthcare hub of a large rural area in Northeast Indiana. We border with Northwest Ohio. So there’s not a lot of opportunity for very awesome, like technology or upwardly mobile jobs that are not related to those sectors that I just mentioned. There’s some back office functions that are happening with some large companies, but what’s here is manufacturing, and like I said, educational and healthcare.

Tyler Sellhorn:

So I think it’s one of those things where like, I wasn’t … What matched my expectations, the opportunity to connect to a job that lit me up that was exciting. And I think that’s the thing that I might say to your listeners, right? As they’re thinking about building and leading remote teams, there is opportunity. I like to, quote Matt Mullenweg and his phrase of saying that “Talent is equally distributed, but opportunity is not.” And so I really feel incredibly grateful for the opportunity that 2019 provided to me and that 2022 is offering all of you listening, that you don’t have to tether your vocation to your location any longer, right? I want to encourage you to let loose of the moorings in whatever harbor you find yourself and chase the wind where it blows you, because there is opportunity for you out in the vast ocean of remote work.

Tyler Sellhorn:

There is opportunity for you to set your sail in a way that gives you the joy and the experiences that you are seeking. I think that’s one of the things that I’ve learned most as I’ve transitioned to a “internet job,” right? Is to say that, the more and more that I can reside and be present in the internet, the more … I have a person that I admire deeply. His name is Karthik Puvvada, he’s the program director of the On Deck No-Code programs there, and he uses this phrase of expanding your luck surface area.

Tyler Sellhorn:

And I think that’s one of the things that by being … I’m now a podcaster in the remote space and you try to share what I’m learning, right? That’s my phrase is that, I am grateful to be here with you today. Learning out loud, is that you don’t have to have it all figured out, right? You can be somebody who is able to be met and learn with at all times, right? You can build a website, you can have a LinkedIn profile, you can be someone who just engages with people on Twitter and become a person that is more than their location, right? The more that we choose to reside in the internet, the more that we have opportunity come our way.

Luis:

Yeah. There’s a couple of good points that we should revisit there, right? The luck surface area really hits home because the reality is that the internet was always a place with infinite opportunities for learning. But now it’s becoming a place with infinite opportunities for working, which is non-trivial. And usually I’ve dedicated a couple of podcasts, for example, to talk about inequality and not just inequality within a country, like in your case US and in my case, Portugal, but just global inequality and how remote work helps actual people from countries where it’s harder to learn a good quality of life paycheck to find jobs in other countries without having to move. And that does create, weal, is slowly creating a bit of a better economic balance.

Luis:

That’s part of that surface area conversation. But I want to go back to the learning because the reality is that we’re making it up as we go along in this, you commented some minutes ago about the pre 2019 remote people, right? But the reality is even we, right? I’ve been doing some form of remote work, partially not fully, right? Since 2009, something like that. Because just on the writer, because writers have worked remotely for a long time. So just in terms of managing a writing content team and writing myself, and I interacted with people through the internet, basically ever since the internet was invented, but seriously-

Tyler Sellhorn:

Right. Teleworking has been a thing long before 2019, long before 2009, 1979.

Luis:

Yeah, exactly.

Tyler Sellhorn:

There’s definitely aspects to what we’re doing that is not unique, right?

Luis:

Yeah.

Tyler Sellhorn:

But, but the amount and the types of work that is happening that way, is unique and is different.

Luis:

Yeah. But the point though, is that even people that by 2019 had been doing it for 10 or more years, it’s still a decade, people and businesses and work is very complex, right? Teams are very complex entities, especially as it starts to scale and so we’re all learning and making it up as we go along, even the most experience of us, that’s why I created the podcast, right? Even though by the time I started the podcast, I had been doing remote work at least semi partially, for least eight years, I still felt, okay, I need to learn. What’s the best way to learn more about how to remote while at the same time producing something, doing something productive. And my answer to that was building this podcast.

Luis:

Right. And it seems like you’ve started doing something similar, which it brings me to my next question, right? Since you started this, and especially since you started podcasting, what have been your, let’s say the top three takeaways, what were the one, two or three lessons that you learned with someone that really impacted the way you’re doing your remote work and working with your remote team?

Tyler Sellhorn:

Well, the thing that really kicked off my shift to becoming an internet person on the internet, doing internet things, right, was, a former principal of mine had moved to a different school district and we met, I was just trying to network internally. And this was what prompted me to say something that I’ve said earlier, right? Is that I stopped asking for permission to do the next thing, right? There is no one putting a cap on you or your career, except yourself. You have the opportunity to go and do and be anything that you choose to be. And I know that so many times we hear that phrase and you can be anything and it feels so-

Luis:

And follow your passion.

Tyler Sellhorn:

… smarmy and like a joke, but one of the people, and this is be the thing that I want to invite us to think about as a second thing, is that we really need to believe in the idea of a growth mindset. And this is something that I used as a school teacher, right? I’ve always been an enthusiastic empathetic educator, right? And one of the people that was really a guiding light of my school teaching career and now also my remote leadership career is Carol Dweck. I highly recommend her TED talk called the Power of yet. She has a book, lots of people have heard of the idea that, growth mindset. She has an idea called mindset. And it really is this idea that whatever it is that we would like to be able to do or to learn or to accomplish, it’s really important for us to imagine that it is something that we have not yet done instead of something that we can’t do, right?

Tyler Sellhorn:

And so that’s the thing that I think is really important is that some of us are thinking, and imagining that, “Well, we can’t do this in remote, and it’s really got to change.” We’ve really got to let go of the past. And these office simulations, we’ve got to let go of so many of the things that were just the way we’ve done them forever. And we’ve got to say, “Okay, well, just because it hasn’t been done yet, doesn’t mean we can’t do it.” And so I think that when we make the effort to create the new world of work, right? I’m a huge fan of Reese Black and what they’re doing at Oyster. And just introducing and positioning this as a new thing, even though, as we just described, people have been teleworking, long before it was a thing, and long before telework was a word people had been working away from a specific location. And I think that is really important for us to lean into the idea that we have not yet done some things in the remote space, but that doesn’t mean we had to do them, right?

Tyler Sellhorn:

And we’re learning as we go along, as you described. And then I think the third thing for me that has been a guiding light for me as well, is Brene Brown, she’s actually, I listened to her podcast and she’s been having people on recently that the Dare to Lead podcast, that are like haters on the idea of remote work and what are the things that are happening there? So I’m calling you out Brene, we need to have a dissenting voice to the consensus that you’ve been having there, but her ideas that she expressed in Dare to Lead called … Really her definition of power that she’s borrowing from the American civil rights leader, Martin Luther king Jr. The idea that power is the ability, right, and the opportunity to make change, right?

Tyler Sellhorn:

And so the idea is that power is not something to be expressed over others, but it’s something to be expressed to, with and within others. And when we make that shift from power over, right, to power to, with and within, power expands, it’s not finite. It’s not something to be grasped and held onto. There is not a scarcity of power in the world unless we make it so, right? If we choose to make that shift, and this is the theme of remote work throughout, right, is to say, “I trust you to do your job to the best of your ability without you having to be physically present with me.”

Luis:

Yeah. That’s who you call it empowering, right? I tend to look at it from a persuasion point of view, right? There are many ways that you can be persuasive as if that you can persuade others. And in essence, I see leading a team, as an exercise in persuasion, right? You have a plan. You want people to follow along with the plan or contribute to the plan, to the best of their abilities. And traditionally, the bad boss persuasion used to be, fear-based persuasion. You do what they say, or you need to find another job. And there are still an alarming amount of people that manage like that. And the reality is that, that persuasion works. Fear persuasion works to a point, right? Fear persuasion works until someone has a way out and then they’ll get out.

Luis:

While it works, I would say that it’s the lowest form of persuasion. One of the highest forms of persuasion is freedom, right? When you say “Well, let’s work as a team, let’s try to accomplish what we want to accomplish. And the end result is more freedom for everyone,” And by the way, here’s some freedom by working remotely, you have the freedom to work in the way that’s more productive to you, when it’s more productive to you et cetera, right? That I find to be highly persuasive.

Luis:

So both approaches work, right? And of course there are many other ways to be persuasive when leading, but just these to me are at the end of the spectrum, both of them works, fear works and freedom works, but only one works long term, right? So that’s how I tend to see what you mentioned as power and empowering.

Tyler Sellhorn:

Right. And one of the things that seems surprising to me is just how surprised everyone is by the great resignation, right? No one has stepped back and reflected on how they’ve been approaching their workforces and said to themselves, “Okay, if we no longer have the power over somebody about where, and when they’re going to be working, what does that mean for how we are approaching our workforce as leaders, person to person, intra-personally, and then also, how we’re approaching them as an employment contract, as a place to work from, right? Whether we are in an office or not, right?” Very much so even for those office first organizations, right? It is exceedingly possible for people to say goodbye to … This has been a thing that we’ve been experiencing for a long time, right?

Tyler Sellhorn:

Where it’s saying, “Okay, more and more people are just choosing to work for themselves, more and more people are choosing to work on the side, more and more people are saying, “I’m not going to depend solely on my employer for all of my income, and I’m going to stop letting them express that power over me.” And the problem is, is that misunderstanding of the employment relationship, no one, let me say this very clearly to anyone out there that is experiencing a job that they do not enjoy, that they are experiencing those leaders that Luis just described. You don’t have to do it anymore. You do not have to be frustrated by who is in charge. You can say goodbye to them and find a place that trusts you.

Tyler Sellhorn:

Find a job that allows you to work, where you’re most productive, where you feel good about, coming to work every day. And when I say coming to work, I’m saying, in terms of the mental space of being a part of a team, being a part of a group of people that want to see one another live their best lives. I think it’s one of those things where we’re saying, what is this work life balance thing? It’s not an either or, it’s not like I’m either working or I’m either living. It’s one of those things where we want to invite people to start imagining their work being, becoming part of their life. That’s the story of my life here in the last three years is to say, “Okay, I’m going to integrate my life with my work. I’m going to put my working times around the things that most important to me.” Like I get to cook breakfast for my family every day.

Luis:

Exactly.

Tyler Sellhorn:

I pick up my children from school every day.

Luis:

And to the point, right? Lest we paint too rosy a picture, right? People still have to work and sometimes work sucks. For example, this is a very enjoyable part of my work. Having conversations with people such as you, but yesterday I needed to spend four hours pouring over Google analytics, keyword reports, right? That is not an exciting part of my day, but you know what, because I’m at home, right? I get to take a break, right? I get to take a break every 200th entry, right? I get to hang back from the computer, play a PVP match on my Xbox or go take a nap or go brew some coffee. And then I can go back again and do the work refreshed. Sometimes even though, obviously, I want people to follow their passion and stuff like that, sometimes work is just work, right?

Luis:

No matter how much you love your profession, there are some things that you’ll need to do that are just a bit of a grind, but guess what, you can manage your energy. So you do those things better. And more pleasantly, if your bosses, if your business gives you that trust and latitude.

Tyler Sellhorn:

Right. One of the phrases that I use inside of the customer experience team here at Yac is that I believe very strongly that the robots should do the robotic things and the humans get to show up as their best selves when they do, right? And I think that’s one of those things where it’s like, okay, obviously there’s going to be some parts of our jobs that are going to be drudgery, but when you are doing that, what is it in the surface of, right? It’s much easier to do the crummy parts of any job, if it’s in the service of you being able to travel, or you being able to live. The story of my life is that I’m now a technology company executive, from a place that almost none of that type of work is available, unless I were to start a company for myself, right?

Tyler Sellhorn:

And I think that’s the other thing that people are finding out, is that okay? Well, there’s a scarcity of founders and abundance of venture capital. “Well it turns out that there’s an opportunity for me to get started on the thing that I had an idea about right now.” And it isn’t just venture capital, it’s also using your current job as the seed funding for whatever side project you want to start whether it’s renovating homes and doing a traditional side business, like being a landlord. Yeah.

Luis:

And by the way, the only people who think there’s an excess of venture capital are the people who haven’t become founders.

Tyler Sellhorn:

There it is.

Luis:

That’s the suggestion. It’s always greener on the other side. But, yeah, you’re are absolutely right. The opportunities are staggering, right? And I do think that one of the things that I wanted to talk, because we went off in a big tangent and I was asking you about your learnings, from the podcast, but that’s fine. This podcast is very tangent friendly, but I do want to go back to some of those learnings and specifically, because your business, right? The tech company that you’re belonging is about communication, right? So I want to bring it back to some learnings around communication, because sometimes I get bored talking about communication because I just seem to hit on it on every other conversation, but it’s still important. If gun to the head, you asked me, why was the thing that makes remote work, work? I would say that is getting the communication right.

Tyler Sellhorn:

Well, at Yac, we very much so believe that there is a remote communication stack that has a big, large hole in the center of it. Right now, most remote team communication is written in the form of an email or an instant message. And then there are also video conference meetings, right? And there is very little vanishing little that defaults to a voice first asynchronous first form of communication. So that’s what we’re building. We’re building an async meeting product that is really trying to give you the opportunity to start a meeting at any time, right? And then put that meeting wherever it belongs, whether that’s on top of email, whether that’s on top of your instant messaging platform or replacing a calendar event, or having it live on top of a document, having it live on top of a project management tool. We’re really big believers in the idea that if you can instantly record your voice or share your screen with your voice, remote team communication speeds up very much.

Tyler Sellhorn:

And this is something that we’re learning from fully remote organizations, as well as heads of remote and people that are saying, “Okay, hey where are we falling down, right?” There’s other competitors in this space as well, but we’re trying to build it from first principles as it relates to not having another app. And that sort of thing. We really want to be able to live on top of the existing workflow and allow you to have a meeting without putting time on everyone’s calendar.

Luis:

So what type of meetings do you think would fit into this? What are your internal case studies? Internal examples.

Tyler Sellhorn:

Okay. So internal examples, lots of times, it’s very clear that we need a document, right? And so we have a little workflow that says, should we create a document? Right? And sometimes the answer is no. And so we’ll just cancel that meeting completely. Sometimes the answer is not yet. And so we’ll just place that in the ice box or in the backlog, we’re very much so in the agile project management mode of things. But the answer sometimes is yes, and the answer is soon, right? And so what we’re going to do is we’re going to have a meeting and we’re going to be trading, voice messages back and forth no matter where we happen to be, we work across time zones, we are a fully distributed organization and so we’re going to trade voice messages as often as we receive them until we get to a voice draft. Right?

Tyler Sellhorn:

Right? And so once we have a voice draft, we will convert that into a text document. We’ll have some review on top of what the text is. And then we’ll publish that as a final draft inside of like our internal Wiki product, it’s not a product inside of our own internal Wiki, but sometimes the answer is yes, we need a document, but not right away. Okay. So we’re going to set a deadline of next Friday or it might be something inside of the next two weeks, right? But then other times we do need a document, but it’s, non-urgent, we’re going to be working on this over the next two months and we’ll send a message in there once a week. And so the idea is that we’re going to use our voices, and that is our natural first language, right?

Tyler Sellhorn:

Is to say, “okay, we’re going to be thinking about this. We’re going to be working on this document in an ongoing fashion with time in between to think,” right? We’re not going to have to be live on a call and get it done before the meeting ends, right? We don’t want to have that urgency, right? We are in fully in the 37 signals, base camp version of things where we’re saying it doesn’t have to be crazy at work, right? We definitely agree with those ideas to say, “Hey, take some time, right? And be reflective, complete communication is much better than fast communication, right? And so that is why we have optimized and built an asynchronous first, not just a remote first organization, but an asynchronous first organization and there’s places and times for us to be getting on a call and being synchronous and jamming on something together. But when we do, that time is much more rich because we are energized by the times that we are away from one another as well.

Luis:

Yeah. That makes absolute sense. I personally find it … This also varies with each individual personality of course, but personally, I don’t believe that I contribute well to group live brainstorming because I like having time to look and roll over things and think, right? And it just distracts me if there’s people on a call doing stuff, but some people do seem to strive there. I wondered if you tried something, it’s not a complete opposite approach. It’s a different approach right? And probably both have their places, both yours and theirs. Have you tried Facebook workspaces right? In virtual reality. I’ve tried it recently and it’s clearly not ready for prime time, but there’s something that’s very magical just about seeing the other person’s avatar and seeing the lip sync, they have lip sync.

Luis:

So when the person is talking and the person is moving, the avatar actually communicates not only the facial expressions and the body language, right? Have you engaged with that at all? Because I do like your approach and it does seem that there’s a place to it. But I do think that Zoom, right? The call that we’re talking about, the call that we’re doing right now, I do think that virtual reality could eventually kill it.

Tyler Sellhorn:

So two things, number one, I think in person and virtually in person, right? As you’re describing doing things inside of the metaverse or an office space type metaverse, I think there is going to be a time and a place for those types of interactions as well. I think the thing that we’re inviting people into, right? And I think that is one of the learnings that we’re going to take with us post pandemic is that work is no longer a place including a virtual place, right? But it also is those places, too, right? We came together for a remote offsite or onsite, or whichever way you want to describe it, because of the corporate words of 2015 are not really applicable in 2022.

Luis:

I think that’s what we’re doing ,it’s flash bag or meek bag.

Tyler Sellhorn:

Yeah. So we got together and that was really powerful. We had an awesome time of working together in the same location at the same time, right? The metaverse so to speak is going to be something that helps sustain that part of our collaboration between in person times ILR, right? I think there’s this blurring of boundaries, right? That I think is at one time dangerous. And then at the same time, like a huge opportunity, right? And I think one of the things that is going to be true is that we ought not throw the good things out with the bad, right? I think what we need to do is recognize that there are trade offs to every type of communication that we choose, and we should have a full spectrum of ways to communicate and choose the best one for the use case.

Luis:

Yeah. Absolutely. That makes absolute sense. All right. So I want to wind down with some rapid fire questions, but you don’t need to answer them in rapid fire fashion you can take as long as you’d like Tyler, again, no time pressure. But the first question that I would ask is, if you could buy one thing for everyone in your team up to 100, 150 bucks, right? And the rule is that you can’t give them the money nor a cash equivalent, like a gift card. You actually need to buy something in bulk. Why would you give them? And it can be anything, a tool, app experience, physical, digital unit.

Tyler Sellhorn:

Okay. Can I stretch it to $175 USD.

Luis:

Yeah. Sure.

Tyler Sellhorn:

Okay. So I am a huge fan of noise canceling headsets that also have a noise canceling microphone. There are people that prefer to work inside of a co-working space or a cafe. And obviously we’re audio first people at Yac. And I think that having a way to express yourself with your spoken voice that is clear, and then also being able to listen to others in a way that is clear without background noise is a huge part of being able to communicate well in a remote team, whether it’s on a video conference, whether it’s inside of a recorded voice message or a screen share, like you can do on Yac, having a great sound input and output system is really important in a remote team.

Luis:

All right. What would you buy specifically? Do you have any favorite brands?

Tyler Sellhorn:

The jabra evolve 75 is why I stretched it to $175. Those are the ones that I have when I’m out and about. And I really like them.

Luis:

Yeah. That’s actually been previously recommended in this podcast. So you’re in good company.

Tyler Sellhorn:

We’re rhyming.

Luis:

Yeah, exactly. You’re in good company. Why was for yourself? What have you purchased this in the last, let’s say one year that improved your work situation, your work life balance, whatever metric you care to use.

Tyler Sellhorn:

In my home setup, I really encourage people to face the exterior light in their home and then to buy daylight lights for their lamps in their room to match the color temperature of the daylight that’s coming in through the window. When you have the light behind you or to the side, I don’t think you end up appearing or visually the computer has to do a bunch of trying to guess in between color temperatures what to display on the video conference. And I think getting those matched up is a really good idea to look your best in a virtual meeting.

Luis:

Interesting. So you’ve referenced a few, right? You’ve referenced the books from 37signals/base camp, you’ve referenced the TED talk as well, but I’m wondering first if you’re a book giver, and if you are a book giver, what are the books that you’ve given out the most? And doesn’t need necessarily to be related to remote work?

Tyler Sellhorn:

Yeah, so the book that I have given the most and recommended the most is the one book that I had mentioned earlier, that you didn’t say back to me just now is Brene Brown’s Dare to Lead. It is the most pithy and actionable summary of her research to this point. I think recently, she published another book called Atlas of the Heart. It’s also really good, but the one that’s probably most applicable to your audience and the people that I speak to. And I think it’s also just maybe the best version of her work being expressed is Dare to Lead. And it’s really important to be thinking about how we are working together from first principles. And I think that is what it really narrows down into it. We mentioned her definition of power on this podcast, and I think that PDF at a minimum, is worth getting. And so I have those URLs saved in my clipboard manager. So like I share them all the time.

Luis:

Nice. Great. All right. Okay. This question is a bit longer, so please bear with me. The setup is a bit long, let’s say that we are in a situation. I don’t know what are the COVID restrictions and where you are at right now, but let’s say that we’re in a situation where we can very easily go out and hang out to dinner again.

Luis:

So you are organizing a dinner and in attendance are going to be the executives, the decision makers of the top tech companies from all around the world. And of course being you, the theme of the dinner, the round table is going to be around remote work and the future of work. Here’s the twist, the restaurant where you’re hosting this dinner is a Chinese restaurant. So you, as the host, get to pick what goes inside the fortune cookies. So what is the message that these people are going to be reading when they open their fortune cookies?

Tyler Sellhorn:

Okay. I enjoy the serendipity of fortune cookies. I think that one of the things that I would most want to have, leading company leaders be reflecting on as they depart, whatever dinner we were at is to say and this is a part of the themes we’ve been talking about “when you share power, you are at your best.”

Luis:

Okay. When you share power, you are at your best. That sounds like a lovely place to end.

Tyler Sellhorn:

There it is.

Luis:

All right. So Tyler, it’s been an absolute pleasure having you, and I’d like for you to tell people where can they find you to continue the conversation? Where can they learn more about Yac? What Yac provides and how it can benefit them?

Tyler Sellhorn:

So, Yac’s website is Y-A-C.com, you can find out all about what we’re doing there. We have an awesome blog at yac.com/blog, talking about asynchronous things, remote work things, all the things, really awesome stuff there, and thought leadership that you should be following. You can also follow my podcast @theremoteshow.link. You can find all of the links to everything that I’m up to @tsell.link, T-S-E-L-L.L-I-N-K. And I’m very excited to include this podcast appearance on my personal website tylersellhorn.tech where I’ve appeared. So thank you very much, Luis, for this opportunity to be learning out loud with you all and the DistantJob Podcast listeners.

Luis:

Well thank you for being a guest. It was an absolute pleasure of having you. And that’s it, see you, ladies, gentlemen, this was a DistantJob Podcast, your podcast about building and leading us and remote teams. And I was your host Luis, see you next week.

Luis:

And so we close another episode of the DistantJob Podcast. And if you enjoyed the episode, please, you can help us out by sharing it on social media. That would be great. It’s how we reach more listeners. And the more listeners we have, the more awesome guests I can get in touch and convince to participate in these conversations that are a joy to have for me. And I hope there’s a joy for you to listen to as well.

Luis:

You can also help a lot leaving reviews on iTunes or your podcast syndication service of choice reviews are surprisingly helpful in helping the podcast get to more listeners. Another thing that you might want to do is go to distantjob.com/blog/podcast. Click on your favorite episode, any episode, really, and subscribe, by subscribing you will get a notification whenever a new episode is up and whenever we get the transcripts of the episode up, so you can actually peruse the conversations in text form.

Luis:

And of course, if you need to find a great employee for your team, a great remote employee, you should take the whole world into consideration and not just look to hire locally, not just look to hire in your country, look around the whole world, because that’s the talent pool that contains the best talent. And to help you with that again, distantjob.com is the perfect place to start. You will tell us who we need, and we will make sure that you get the best possible candidate, 40% faster than the industry standard. And with that, I bid you adios, see you next week on the next episode of DistantJob Podcast.

One of the major transformations remote work has had in companies is in terms of communication. Companies had to determine which type of communication worked best for their teams.

During this podcast episode, Tyler Sellhorn shares how remote work is the path to finding your true passion. He also discusses how communication is the number one aspect companies need to focus on. And that while Zoom meetings are great, communication in remote teams is changing and transforming. Each team has to find out what is their best strategy to connect and collaborate.

Highlights:

  • How remote work expands your possibilities to find your passion and vocation
  • The importance of exploring new strategies in the remote work environment
  • Red flags of a toxic workplace environment (and what to do about it)
  • Insights about how to improve communication on remote teams
  • How communication is changing in remote teams

Book Recommendations:

 

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Are you our next superstar remote developer?

You live, breathe and eat code, and have fun figuring out how to solve problems. And you love living in South America or Eastern Europe. But you don’t feel as fulfilled as your friends in North America.

I NEED A JOB