remote job consultationWe are offering free consultations on how to lead & manage remote teams during the COVID-19 crisis. Learn More

Building Trust in Remote Teams with Albert Cañigueral

Albert Cañigueral is a multimedia engineer passionate about the advancements of technology and work. He is the founder of ConsumoColaborativo, a blog about the collaborative economy. He is also the connector for OuiShare Spain & LATAM. He has a background exploring the future of work, and in the past two years, he has dedicated to digital platforms.

Follow our guest on their social media:

Entrepreneur man

Luis:

Welcome ladies and gentlemen to another episode of the Distant Job podcast. This is the podcast that’s all about building and leading awesome remote teams, and I am your host Luis. Today with me I have Albert Caniguereal. And Albert is an explorer of the future of work, and workers, and digital platforms. He is the connector for we OuiShare Barcelona, the Spanish language connector, the founder of Consumo Colaborativo, and he wrote an ebook about finding and retaining top talent in your company thanks, of course, to remote work. Now, as far as I know, that book is in Spanish, so probably… I will link to it in the show notes, but if you want Albert’s wisdom in English, I think this podcast will be a good place to go as well. So Albert, thank you so much for being here.

Albert Caniguereal:

Thank you for hosting. My pleasure.

Luis:

Yeah. When are you translating the book to English?

Albert Caniguereal:

No, this is some work that I’m doing some gigs now, so consultancy work I’m doing for Welcome to the Jungle, which is a French company who is doing employer branding. And they translate the books to different languages and they localize the books, it’s not only translation, they also localize the books to different cultures, French, English and Spanish. It might be available in English. I’m not sure about this one specifically because they do not translate all of them. Some of them they do.

Luis:

Oh, cool. So once we finish the podcast be sure to send me links to your library. I read it in Spanish, but my Spanish is not the best, so I couldn’t fully take as much as I wanted from it, but it was a really nice read, some nice practical advice, so thank you for that. Tell me a bit about your work in the area and obviously you’re working with OuiShare. I would like to tell the listeners a bit about OuiShare is and what they do, and also about, well, the other work that you’re doing.

Albert Caniguereal:

Yeah, thank you. Yeah, OuiShare, it’s a collective of… between a community and a collective of people who are interested in the impacts of the digital technologies in society as a whole, so it’s very large and very diverse. Inside the community, you have people who are dealing with the digital gap in the poor neighborhoods of Paris, people who are leaving methodologies like the platform design toolkit from Rome.

Luis:

Nice.

Albert Caniguereal:

Or some colleagues here in Barcelona working on the [inaudible 00:02:45] organization from [inaudible 00:02:46], Reinvent the Organization is probably familiar to you or some of the audience, so they are doing consultancy job on that space. We have no employees, we are all freelancers, and then we just join together to develop the projects on other basis, like going to the Hollywood studios. Hollywood studios, they have a director, a producer, and then they hire all the cast, and all the people for the camera gears, and all the specialists, and all the whatever. We work a little bit the same in the area of knowledge management and consultancy on the impacts of digital technology in society. And in these contexts, which is already pretty interesting, let’s say, to work and live like that, no?

Luis:

Yeah, yeah.

Albert Caniguereal:

Because a lot of your colleagues are remote, for example, so we use a number of tools to synchronize, and so on, then we can enter into these later on. So in these areas of exploration I decided to focus on the future of work and digital platforms for the last, I would say, year and a half, two years. And this is what I’ve been exploring these days. We also say we are more explorers than experts because things go so fast that being an expert is impossible, so we prefer just to be curious people. And exploring alone is, yeah, it’s kind of boring and even dangerous, so it’s always better to explore with some colleagues.

Luis:

Yeah, that’s actually a point that I make every now and then on the podcast that we are really in a new frontier and no one knows how to do this right. Whoever tells you that knows how to do this right is lying. But we do have a lot of different experiences and that’s what I try to bring to the podcast, is to bring people from a diverse set of backgrounds and industries with different experiences. And so through that, through those experiences we can figure out some best practices that can help us improve, right? There’s a couple of things that I want to pick up from where you said. You talked about the future of work, which is becoming something that’s more commonly being of interest, but you also talk about something more specific, that is digital platforms. Why did you decide to pick the field of digital platforms and what’s the thing there that excites you the most right now?

Albert Caniguereal:

Okay. A very good question. The point is, as you mentioned during my introduction, I founded this blog Consumo Colaborativo, which talks about the sharing economy in a Spanish language. So obviously my background for the last five or six years has been digital platforms. After looking at the mobility, tourism, finance, insurance, whatever, education, I felt that the area where the impact of these platforms would have a stronger social impact would be on the labor market, on the future of work.

Luis:

Nice.

Albert Caniguereal:

Because digital platforms are an extremely efficient tool to coordinate and to manage an ecosystem, especially when you have offer and demand. You create the marketplace. The wall of work, or the wall of the jobs, or labor, is a skill very analog. And we see the emergence of more and more digital platforms who are intermediating between the talent of one site and the company or the people who need to consume this talent on the other side. And it can be from microtasking platforms like Amazon Mechanical Turk. I’m not sure if you are familiar with this division of Amazon.

Luis:

Yeah. [inaudible 00:06:31]

Albert Caniguereal:

Or more complex tasks like the gig economy, people on [inaudible 00:06:35] or O Globo, or where you also have freelancers platforms like Abwork, Malt and others, or even people who are super specialized. You have a wide range of platforms who are intermediating different types of jobs for different types of companies. And more and more of the companies are starting to adopt this strategy of having a percentage of their workforce as contingent workforce, external workforce, so they can be more dynamic on responding to the market dynamics, to the market changes. And I was observing that, and I think that will have a strong impact on how we live and how we organize our life, and this is why I’ve decided to focus a little bit on that space.

Luis:

Yeah, that makes a lot of sense. So you said you started this like two or three years ago, and since you started, what have you changed your mind the most about? What were some assumptions that you had going in that you felt were not accurate, that you dropped since then?

Albert Caniguereal:

One that is relatively obvious is that it’s not the experience of the workers through [inaudible 00:07:46] platform, it can be very, very diverse. The people, all of them will be managed by algorithms, so there’s this famous sentence, “My boss is an algorithm on a platform.” So it’s the algorithm who will hire you, who will accept your credentials. It’s the algorithm who will send you work if your credentials are good or not, and then other people will evaluate you, so you have the reputation that will have an influence on future prospects of work in the platform. And if you are not performing well, the algorithm will kick you out from the platform.

Albert Caniguereal:

But this experience is very different from people on the gig economy, or people on the blue collar, more the service sector, or retail, hotels and so on. Or the freelancers, no? At the beginning I was, because I didn’t know enough the diverse type of shops, I had this assumption of, “Okay, all platforms will be more or less the same.” Obviously it’s not the case. There is a large diversity. Actually, I wrote an article saying that there is no… The platform worker does not exist as a singleton. Every experience is very different for different people.

Luis:

Yeah. And I wonder how much that is good. I mean, on one hand when you say, “My boss is an algorithm,” you kind of feel like you’re being… you are dependent on an entity that’s not human, that’s like cold and heartless and sees you as a piece of… as a cog in a machine, right? That can be very disheartening, but on the other side of the spectrum I’ve known, as you’ve probably known and as I think everyone knows, we’ve all known people who worked more for appeasing their bosses, their human bosses, than for doing an actual good job. That’s not good as well, right? Do you think that this, this algorithm boss, is overall a net positive or a net negative?

Albert Caniguereal:

It depends. I wouldn’t say there is no single conclusion on that. So as I said, it’s not the same scenario for someone who is riding a bike delivering goods in a city than for someone who is coding JavaScript programs through a platform like Malt or Abwork. Their capacity to negotiate with the platform and with the algorithm is higher than on the other case. So it’s basically a balancing power, how much power has the employer, how much power has the employee or the worker? And in that respect this is where the algorithm will have different type of effects. But, and as you said, I think it’s very interesting what you said that sometimes a good boss algorithm might be better than a bad human manager. So in some cases… I know because a lot of people complain about their managers, so sometimes an algorithm can be even more fair and help to organize better your work. But we’ll see. The other day I was reading a research article for my Spanish researcher, and he was quoting about this algorithmic management. He was quoting the Asimov Laws of the Robots, the three laws of the-

Luis:

Oh, yeah, the Three Laws of Robotics.

Albert Caniguereal:

So saying that, yeah, we should apply these laws to also this algorithm, because at the end it’s kind of a robot that doesn’t have a physical… And the first law is do not harm the humans. So how can we create responsible algorithms so the life of the workers is good? And I think we’ll see more and more companies going into responsible ways.

Luis:

Yeah, but that’s harder than it seems. For example, let’s say that someone is doing a bad job. Let’s say that someone is doing a bad job, then the algorithm needs to make the decision, right? I should fire this person, but if I fired them I’m harming them, right? On the other hand, if they keep doing a bad job someone else will be eventually harmed, right? Maybe it’s the shareholders of the company, maybe it’s the colleagues, maybe it’s the clients, but bad work has consequences. So that law in particular, it seems simple at first but actually what is more harmful? To keep the person employed but doing a bad job, for instance. It’s not an easy question, right?

Albert Caniguereal:

No, no, that’s why it’s interesting to set this kind of relatively ambiguous laws because they have a lot of consequences that you can not foresee in the first moment.

Luis:

Yeah, exactly.

Albert Caniguereal:

That said, I think there has been maybe an over-focus on this algorithmic management, which is important, but it has also some positive sides, especially these are the platforms are enabling a lot of people who do not fit in the standard box of 9:00 to 5:00 job, always the same place, always the same things. So people who might have some… they need to take care of some family members, or they are young and just want to work few hours, or they have some kind of a disability, physical or mental, whatever. It can be a challenge for them to be part of the traditional workforce.

Luis:

Yeah.

Albert Caniguereal:

It’s very interesting to see the impact of [inaudible 00:13:13] platforms as a vehicle for inclusion of these alternative forms of labor [inaudible 00:13:21].

Luis:

Oh yeah, absolutely. And that’s-

Albert Caniguereal:

And in the… Sorry. And also another interesting impact that I was not aware at the beginning, especially in countries, developing countries… I don’t like the word developing, but we understand there’s some countries in Latin America, or Southeast Asia, or Africa, some governments are super interested on these platforms because they formalize the economy. It’s very informal economies that when you digitize and when you make digital the credentials, the transactions, the money and everything, then it’s a lot easier to control and to check what’s going on with your economy and your labor market, for example.

Luis:

Oh yeah, absolutely. That’s a good point. You talked before when we, near to the start of the program, you told me that really the way that you interact with your coworkers is a bit like a Hollywood production, right? There’s a director, there’s a producer, and then you grab people and people come together. Multiple cells come together and they fit in a way that they make a production. I would like you to tell me a bit, or give an example of how that happens in a bit more detail. So let’s say that you have a project, and please feel free to give me an example of a project and how do the things work? Let’s start maybe by the gathering of the crew, and then we can talk about goal setting, and check-ins and management, and figuring out how everyone works in concert.

Albert Caniguereal:

Yeah, for example, a project that I developed last year, it’s a two days event about the future of work, it’s called Reshaping Work, started in Amsterdam three years ago, and now it’s a kind of a series of events around the world. And Barcelona was the first of them to be outside of Amsterdam, so it’s called Barcelona Reshaping Work. You can check the website and there’s a-

Luis:

When is the next one?

Albert Caniguereal:

The next one is going to be in Madrid, not in Barcelona in this case, in Madrid on October of this year, October 2020.

Luis:

Oh, nice.

Albert Caniguereal:

I still don’t know the exact date but we are looking for the date. But projects like that, which is like, “Okay, let’s go for an event of two days.” I would say I have this role of director and little bit of producer because I will be looking for the funding mechanism. And then what I need to do is to convince the people from the community that this is an interesting project for them. On one side I will try to cherry-pick and attract some people which I like to work with for communication, for example. Not people who are good at communication and strategy because we need to explain [inaudible 00:16:10]. People who are good at finances and they are good financial controllers because you need to do all the financial management. Or people who are good at production of the event. You need to get the venue, or the catering, all the decoration, all the visual material.

Luis:

Yeah, of course.

Albert Caniguereal:

So people who are good at documentation, because we want to write a small booklet after event. So I know some people, I will try to attract them and to convince them that they can work with me in this project. In this context, people really appreciate the freedom, so I will invite them to join, but I’m not going to tell you how to do this. I’m not going to micromanage these people more. Okay, let’s work together because we get along well, and there’s some funding coming in so we can have some fun developing this project that is interesting for you, for me, and if I’m bringing you on board is because you know more than I do on this subject. I’m not going to tell you how to do things. It’s more, “What do you need from me to do your work.”

Albert Caniguereal:

And then also, if there are some roles which are open or which are still missing, then you can do kind of an open call in the community saying, “Okay, I’m looking for people who would like to join this project.” And there is also a kind of roles which are more volunteers for the date of the event, like managing the room, or taking care of the speakers, or maybe being in the registration desk, and so on. And this is just one day job, or something, that a lot of people are happy to take as a volunteer job [inaudible 00:17:38]. And in this way the community sticks together, and works together, and so on.

Luis:

Yeah, so that’s the gathering the team part and it’s very interesting. But you did point out that you don’t micromanage, that you let people contribute the best way they can, but I assume that there are some guidelines, or goals set up, because let’s say that… let’s pick up your example of organizing a conference. There’s a message that you want to transmit and that message, just in marketing terms, needs to be coherent on the decoration on the place, on the emails, on the booklet, et cetera. So the people, which I assume they are a very diverse cast of people, need to be on the same page. So once you actually have the team, how do you lay out your project in your digital tools, and how do you come up with the guidelines, and how much participation do the other people have in coming up with the guidelines that they will be working under?

Albert Caniguereal:

Usually it’s more this kind of guidelines, yeah, obviously they exist, and that’s part of what I think is the role of the director, to create the first iteration of these guidelines. But these guidelines, or these master messages, are always open to improvement, open to suggestions. For example, the tagline that we had at the beginning was very technical and we changed it to another better tagline that some people suggested. Or even the communication and strategy would also change, and so on. So it’s good to provide the initial layout of, “Okay, maybe we could start in this direction,” but not setting, “This is the way to do it.” No, it’s like, “Okay, let’s try to be on that speed.”

Albert Caniguereal:

Then we use tools in order to coordinate if we are… The people who are in Barcelona being an event or we try to… We have a coworking space where you have an office. We try to gather there for some of the meetings, and then obviously we use Hangouts or Zooms, and we do a biweekly meeting, for example, to synchronize and coordinate. For transparency, we use Google Drive, so everybody has the access to everything from the project, from finance, from documentation, from marketing, from whatever, from the context of all the speakers, so everybody has access to everything.

Luis:

Nice.

Albert Caniguereal:

We also use Trello, different Trello boards in order to coordinate the progress on different fronts of the project. And in this case we also use something quite interesting, it’s called Airtable. It’s a… I don’t know if you know this tool Airtable.

Luis:

Yeah, I’ve tried it.

Albert Caniguereal:

So we took a template for managing events from Airtable and it was really good. In order to have a single [crosstalk 00:20:20]-

Luis:

 

Albert Caniguereal:

… a single point with all the information gathered in the same place. And everybody really enjoys… will work well if you have personal trust, analog trust. People will reply fast on… Sorry, and I forget. We usually coordinate also through Telegram Channel. For the project, we create a Telegram Channel where we coordinate. We try with the Slack, but people were a little bit lazy to get into Slack, and so on. Actually, it was a decision from the team. We said, “Should we use Slack, WhatsApp or Telegram for team coordination?” And everybody said Telegram, so okay, so we go for Telegram.

Albert Caniguereal:

So it’s a combination of these optics tools. We don’t use a unified suite. It’s just a number of tools that we bend together for the project. And usually it’s… We also like to try new tools. Like this Airtable was an experiment in this project because we had the suggestion from another project and said, “Hey, this is good. Okay, let’s try it if people seem to be happy with it.” And then, I don’t know. And all these tools work well when you have analog trust, when you have personal trust. Because sometimes if not, the distance can be a little bit too much.

Luis:

Yeah. So [inaudible 00:21:38] go to a couple of different points there. You are talking about, specifically with the project of building a conference, you are talking about something where deadlines are critical because it involves atoms, not bits, right? At some point you need to have a venue, at some point you need to print stuff, at some point you need to have furniture, outlet, et cetera, right? So it’s not delay friendly project. So again, we come to the part of the keeping the people accountable. How does the director of the movie keep the people accountable, and how does the director of the movie keep track of everything that’s happened? When do you check in with people? How often do you do it? How are those check-ins handled?

Albert Caniguereal:

As I said, we usually have biweekly coordination meetings, and then when the deadline or when the date of the event is getting closer, then we have our weekly coordination meetings, but this is mostly to understand what are the needs, what are the points that are not progressing well. Otherwise, it’s more about people telling other people what they need. It’s not so much I’m controlling… Obviously from time to time I need to check through things, but it’s more about offering my personal help, or the help of other people involved in the project, to move forward. It’s not so much being, as I said, micromanaging, “You need to do this by this date,” and so on. It’s more about asking, “What do you need? How can I help?” And so on.

Albert Caniguereal:

And especially having a mechanism of trust that if there is any issue people report it as soon as possible, and because everybody has access to all the information, everybody is also aware of the risk of each activity and what are the critical paths, let’s say, or the critical activities. For example, we had one situation where the production leader [inaudible 00:23:46] who was taking the lead on the production had an important family issue, and she had to leave to her home country and leave the project because she couldn’t do this work remotely in this stage because she had to be in Barcelona for that. So she alerted in advance where the situation was developing, saying that might happen, at the end it happened. So we were ready already, and because the rest of the members of the team knew about this everybody was helping to find a replacement. It was a team effort also to manage all the situation. It’s about feeling a team and really developing this area where people can trust and be transparent, and so on. It’s easier said than done.

Luis:

Yeah, that’s what I was… I mean, I wasn’t going to say it’s easier said than done, but that is the area where I want to dig a bit deeper, is in the trust part because that’s… This is something that I often ask guests and I always get different answers, so I’m always interested in keeping asking the question, and it’s a good time now. How do you build that trust? What is your process for building that trust? Because what I see happening a lot, and this is my personal experience as well, I often have to give leaps of faith, right? The more I work with someone, the more I develop trust, but when I’m working with several people for the first time, it’s a bit hard to build that trust immediately through the internet. The best solution I found for it is really is video calls, like the ones we do. But even then, if you’re on video every day with someone, then that’s not productive, right? You should be working at some point instead of talking on video.

Albert Caniguereal:

Yeah, I completely agree. Usually I gain the initial trust of people in a small project, not a large project like this one. I’m trying to find small events, or small reports, or small things where I can work with people together. The only way to trust someone is to… The only way to know if you can trust someone is to trust them and then validate this assumption. And it’s very binary. You trust someone or you don’t trust someone. There is no middle ground. The middle ground, it means you don’t trust this person.

Luis:

Yeah, it’s, like I say, the leap of faith.

Albert Caniguereal:

This leap of faith needs to be in a smart way, in a small project, in a small audience where you can check with the people if you’ll get along together, if they deliver on time, if they communicate as you expect. And also on your site so it’s bidirectional, because there’s also… Trust has to be bidirectional. And with these people then you can engage in larger projects. As I said, the physical meeting from time to time is also important, and especially the developing trust on non-work issues. This is why being a community is important. We go to the cinema from time to time, we go to have drinks. I know the family of the people, I know if they have a dog or not. I know the person, I don’t just know the worker, let’s say, their professional activity. I know their interest, and so on. And then as I said, usually in this last project you also need to include people that are new and you haven’t worked with before. The ideal situation, obviously, if you can get a reference from a good colleague, someone who recommends someone, a chain of trust, let’s say. For me that works pretty well.

Luis:

That’s actually a very good part of being in a community like OuiShare.

Albert Caniguereal:

Because you can ask for help, “Who do you know?” and so on, because there is this level… And being part of the community, you align your values and you align in mission, I’d say. And then obviously in some cases you need to take a risk and just have a leap of faith with someone, and then you need to spend a little bit more time on checking that everything is okay, the commitment is there. And again, also being transparent on your site if something is not working. Just raising the alert to the other person, or to the group, say, “Hey, we have an issue here.”

Luis:

Yeah. Well, it sounds like good advice. I know that our time is coming to an end quite soon, so I want to be respectful of your time and your commitments, so I’m going to move on to some rapid fire questions to finish the show. So tell me, if you had 100 euros to spend with each person in your OuiShare community, what would you give them? And there are a couple of rules here. Number one, you can’t give them the money. Number two, you need to buy the same thing for everyone. You can’t personalize the gifts per person. So something that you would get in bulk for everyone in your community, if you could.

Albert Caniguereal:

I would probably say a subscription, annual subscription, or something to kind [inaudible 00:28:37] or online courses, where people can train themselves or learn. People around OuiShare stay around OuiShare because they learn. It’s a place where you will incubate yourself, where you will develop. If I would have this money for everybody, I would probably… The first thing that came to my mind was more like about membership for training material and for learning, and so on.

Luis:

Nice. Did you have anyone that you prefer, anyone that you recommend that you use yourself?

Albert Caniguereal:

Obviously YouTube is for free. A lot of good contents. No, depends if you are looking for more technical staff, more managerial stuff, but I wouldn’t say a single one. But I think it’s important to keep learning all the time.

Luis:

Of course, of course. That’s a good suggestion. As for yourself, what purchase has made your work life easier or more productive in the past year?

Albert Caniguereal:

In the past year. What did I buy? Something very stupid but it’s more storage on Google Drive because I was running out of space all the time so-

Luis:

That’s good.

Albert Caniguereal:

… I increased my subscription and I have I don’t know how many gigabytes now.

Luis:

Sometimes it’s a small purchase that makes all the difference. I keep telling… My sister keeps running out of space for her photos on iOS and it’s always a big stress for her. And I said, “Well, why are you stressing about…” I used to have that problem and then I pay like… For the next year from going from free to pay, it’s like one euro a month. One euro a month. And you don’t get that stress of keeping against the limit all the time. Why wouldn’t you want to have that in your life? Just because it costs money? It’s almost no money. Yeah. So that’s a good suggestion, I appreciate that. Sometimes the small things help us a lot.

Albert Caniguereal:

Yeah, yeah.

Luis:

What about the books? What book or books have you gifted the most? Or if you aren’t in the habit of giving books, what book has influenced you the most?

Albert Caniguereal:

This year no recent books. Let me think for a second because I’ve been reading quite a lot recently.

Luis:

Oh, nice. It doesn’t have to be recent, by the way. It can be-

Albert Caniguereal:

In this area of the gig economy, one book that I enjoyed a lot is a book from a… It’s called Gigged, G-I-G-G-E-D, The End of Employment or The End of Work, I think, from a journalist called Sarah, Sarah Kessler I think if I’m not mistaken. And she’s able to make a very clear portrait of the impacts of these different types of digital platforms through personal stories that she knows from different characters around the United States. From very good, from very positive to very negative and everything in the middle. And that was a very eye opening book for me because showing the diversity, showing the personal impact and on the life of these people, and so on. And that was really a strong motivation to keep investing on that space. So yeah, I really liked… I will send you later the exact link so you can add it to the podcast links, the title of the book.

Luis:

Nice. I appreciate that. I will include it in the show notes. Okay. So my final question, which should be an easy question for you because you’re used to organizing events. Let’s say that you are organizing a dinner, and on this dinner there’s going to be a round table about the future of work, and going to the dinner are going to be the top technology execs from the whole world. From small to medium, to big companies, the CTOs, the hiring executives, the CEOs, et cetera. And the twist is that the dinner is in a Chinese restaurant. There are going to be Chinese fortune cookies and since you are the host, you get to choose the message that goes inside the Chinese fortune cookie. So what is the message?

Albert Caniguereal:

For everybody?

Luis:

Yes. The same for everybody.

Albert Caniguereal:

The same message for everybody? Well, that’s a complicated one. Yeah, I think what I enjoy in my life, and for everybody I would say stay curious. Don’t lose your curiosity. In order to keep young, and to keep active, and to keep alive, at least in my case and enjoying life, is just to stay curious, surprise yourself. Enable yourself to surprise every week, every day. And in this respect, also talk to a lot of strange people, people you would not normally talk to in your inner circles. Just go out and talk to people that are outside of your circle. You will have a lot of fun and be very surprised. Maybe talk to strange people. That’ll be a nice [inaudible 00:33:37].

Luis:

Talk to strange people. I love it. Well, you are not so strange, but I enjoyed talking with you a lot. Thank you so much, Albert.

Albert Caniguereal:

Welcome.

Luis:

It was a pleasure. Please tell our listeners where they can find you, where can they continue the conversation with you?

Albert Caniguereal:

Very active online both on LinkedIn and Twitter. Twitter account is very active, so you will find me on the handle @AlbertCanig, or on the website albertcanigueral.com you will find all my contact details there, and so on.

Luis:

We will link for that on your show profile.

Albert Caniguereal:

And I just keep publishing all the reports and information, so on, but I would say I’m mostly active on Twitter, and I’m very interactive, also, like having conversations.

Luis:

That’s awesome. Thank you so much for being on this episode of the Distant Job podcast. This was Luis with Albert Canigueral. Ladies and gentlemen, thank you so much.

Albert Caniguereal:

My pleasure. Thank you. Thank you, Luis.

Luis:

And so we close another episode of the Distant Job podcast, and if you enjoyed the episode, please, you can help us out by sharing it on social media. That would be great. It’s how we reach more listeners, and the more listeners we have, the more awesome guests I can get in touch and convince to participate in these conversations that are a joy to have for me, and I hope they’re a joy for you to listen to as well. You can also help a lot leaving reviews on iTunes or your podcast syndication service of choice. Reviews are surprisingly helpful in helping the podcast get to more listeners.

Luis:

Now, another thing that you might want to do is go to distantjob.com/blog/podcast, click on your favorite episode, any episode really, and subscribe. By subscribing you will get a notification whenever a new episode is up and whenever we get the transcripts of the episode up so you can actually peruse the conversations in text form. And, of course, if you need to find a great employee for your team, a great remote employee, you should take the whole world into consideration and not just look to hire locally, not just look to hire in your country. Look around the whole world because that’s the talent pool that contains the best talent. And to help you with that, again, distantjob.com is the perfect place to start. You will tell us who you need and we will make sure that you get the best possible candidate 40% faster than the industry standard. And with that I bid you adieu. See you next week on the next episode of the Distant Job podcast.

 

More ways to listen:

In this podcast episode, Albert Cañigueral talks about the social impact digital platforms are having on the labor market, how they are transforming economies, and the way people work.  He shares his experience in organizing projects and events with freelancers and people from his community working as a distributed team.

''The only way to know if you can trust someone is to trust them and then validate this assumption. And it's very binary. You trust someone or you don't trust someone. There is no middle ground. '' Click To Tweet

What you will learn:

  • How digital platforms are transforming businesses and economies
  • Algorithm boss vs human boss
  • Bidirectional trust in remote teams
  • Insights in his experiences creating events/projects with a community of freelancers
  • Remote working tools

Book Recommendations:

 

This interview is part of the DistantJob podcast. To hear more from leaders and successful entrepreneurs on how to build and lead winning teams, check us out on Anchor.fm and on our website.

Don’t forget to SUBSCRIBE so you won’t miss all of the other interesting episodes that we have coming up in the next few weeks!

Don’t miss out!

Subscribe to our newsletter now and receive our latest eBook “Agile in Remote Teams” for free.