How to Build an Employee-first Culture with Anne Bibb

Anne Bibb is a passionate advocate for remote work and employee engagement. She is the VP and Global Head of Customer Experience at Support Ninja, an Omnichannel provider of customer care and back-office support solutions.

Follow our guest on their social media:

Anne Bibb

Luis:

Welcome ladies and gentlemen to another episode of the DistantJob Podcast. I am your host, Luis, and this podcast that’s all about building and leading awesome, remote teams. My guest today is Anne Bibb. Anne is the VP and Global Head of Customer Experience at SupportNinja, an Omnichannel provider of customer care and back office support solutions. Anne, welcome to the show.

Anne Bibb:

Thank you. It’s nice to be here.

Luis:

It’s a pleasure having you here, and let’s jump right to what’s important, which is remote work, right? We are recording this in 2021. Obviously remote work was the thing in 2020. Mostly everyone had to go work remotely, so what was once a niche thing that some of us were fighting for suddenly became the reality for millions. But you were doing remote work, much as I did, you were pioneering remote work a long time before then. So why don’t you start by telling our listeners about your relationship with remote work, how that impacted your career, and how that applies now at your current position.

Anne Bibb:

I actually started working remotely in the late 90s. It was not the thing to do. In fact, it wasn’t even called remote work back then. I was working for a telecommunication company, and my husband and I, we were separated at the time. And so I was a single parent, and my boss told me, because I was driving 45 minutes to work each way, and he said, “You have a laptop. Do you have internet at home?” And I said, “I do.”

Luis:

That is a very 90s question, by the way.

Anne Bibb:

And I said, “I do. Why?” And he said, “Well you can telecommute.” And I said, “What does that mean?” And he said, “Well, you know what? I know that you’re taking care of your little one. You can telecommute. You can work from home a couple of days a week.” So this was my first journey into two things. It was my journey into working from home, but also the first real step into an employee-first focused boss. And he really put that mindset into me of putting your employee first in order to take care of your business. And it was just eye-opening how much he cared to make sure that I was taken care of, that I could take care of my kid, and that in taking care of me, he knew I was going to take care of the company.

Anne Bibb:

So, that, to me, was very eye-opening at the time. And this was in the late 90s, and from that moment on, as soon as I started working from home, I was hooked. And every company I worked at thereafter had some aspect of working from home. And I was an immediate advocate for two things: Working remotely, and putting your employees first.

Luis:

Those things come hand to hand, right? If you are able to do your work from home, I mean I think that if your employer wants to put the employee first, they need to at least offer that option. That needs to be in the menu, right? There’s no reason why it shouldn’t. In fact, if you don’t put that on the menu I think you’re doing a disservice. Even absent COVID and all of that, some people just don’t thrive in the office, right?

Anne Bibb:

Well, I think that it’s really important to take into consideration where they do thrive, right? Because it may be at home, it may be in the office, it may be, “I just need to be able to work where… I might need to take a break and go work at Starbucks.” And I think that that’s an important distinction. At that particular time in my life, I went into the office two days a week, and then I worked from home a couple of days a week. I worked from home half the day. I worked from the office half the day. So if I look back at that particular time, I would’ve been considered a hybrid employee, right? Thinking back on it, that’s exactly what that was. As I transitioned and I went to different jobs, later I moved into a company called EDS, and I worked in the office and then I’d work from home sometimes. And then I actually moved across the country, and they let me take my job with me. So I worked from anywhere. So I was a work from anywhere employee.

Anne Bibb:

So it just depended on what my organization, as an employee-first organization, allowed me to do, which because they allowed me to do it, I gave everything to that company. And then, a different organization I moved into was strictly work-from-home. Later on, I ended up traveling with a different organization. So again, work from anywhere. I’d work from home part time. I’d travel, and I’d go to the corporate office and I’d work from that corporate office once a month, or I’d go to a client’s site. So depending on what your thought process is, that might be a hybrid organization.

Anne Bibb:

So it comes down to: How does that employee work best? If you look at some people, they might not be successful that way. I know many individuals that would not thrive, and do not thrive, working from home. They actually need to be in the office. They need to be sitting next to somebody to be able to get that socialization, or have that side-by-side interaction, whether it be training a couple of days a week, or something to be able to bounce ideas and communicate. The isolation and the individual working does not work for them. So it’s about working with your employees, figuring out what works best for them, and putting them first to be able to get the best productivity out of them. And then, they will make sure that your customers and your customers are providing a good customer experience.

Luis:

Yeah. So I absolutely agree with that. I’ve known many people… There are a lot of people in the remote work space that tend to say that remote is the way that we should work moving forward forever for everyone. And I don’t agree with that. Personally, it’s a personal philosophy of mine that you should never say never, or always, right? Never and always are never-

Anne Bibb:

Never say never.

Luis:

Exactly. Exactly. Because look, everyone is different and I know people who thrive, and are really incredibly skilled and gifted professionals, but they just need that space, that connection, that ritual of changing, of having the people around them. So I absolutely agree that when a company says, “We are fully remote,” DistantJob is a fully remote company, and we hire for that. We have 10 years of experience in hiring, we’re a recruitment company. So when we hire people, we make sure first to inform, and then to hire people that thrive remotely. But the reality is that if you can’t get someone who thrives in the office and then teach them to do remote, or provide them the things that they need to work remotely and expect them to succeed, because it’s different personality types, there’s different ways of working, of communication, et cetera.

Luis:

So sure, it’s really good. For some companies it makes sense. For others maybe it won’t. But it’s nice to have the option of having an office. And some companies have built this and figured out, “Okay, we’re closing the office because none of our people use them.” But then others, they see that people go and thrive in the office. So speaking a bit to the situation, obviously it’s one of the challenging situations, which is having a hybrid team, right? Having a team where some people are remote, and some people are in the office. You’ve been in that situation, as you just told me, so why don’t you speak to me, tell me a little bit about that. How did that situation work out? What did you find were the biggest challenges? And how did you solve them, or your employers solve them?

Anne Bibb:

I do want to answer that, but I want to go back to one thing that you just said that was very poignant really quick.

Luis:

Please do.

Anne Bibb:

And that was: You very pointedly said you hire people specifically for remote. You are specifically looking for individuals to work remotely. That means that you are pointedly… I mean, a lot of people in today’s world that are working remotely were forced to do so. If they were actively looking for a job, and it said, “This is a remote job,” they may not apply for that job.

Luis:

Exactly.

Anne Bibb:

Because they know, “That is not what I want.” They would actively look for something that was in an office, or a hybrid situation. So it is important whenever you are sourcing or hiring that you are absolutely telling people what they are going to be doing, where they are going to be working, and be transparent with those candidates of where they’re going to be working going forward. The onboarding experience is just as important for individuals and candidates as is the employee experience. So, I just wanted to go back and touch on that because it was very poignant what you said about making sure that DistantJob, when they’re hiring people, they’re specifically looking for remote employees and people that are going to thrive remotely.

Anne Bibb:

So transitioning to your next question of the challenges of hybrid, globally organizations are struggling, and they’ll continue to struggle, and I think that that is something that we’re going to need to focus on. 2020 was a great year for remote work in that technology companies tried to focus on the solution of remote. There were a lot of grate technological advancements in that area. Collaboration, training, making sure that employee engagement, even some great tools from identifying mental health awareness in the remote work environment. Now I think what’s happening is that we’ve got a lot of data and information from 2020, 12 months worth of information, right? That’s a lot of analytical information to be able to pull from. Now, the vaccine has arrived, people are starting to get vaccinated, companies are realizing that they may want to… Some people want to go back to the office. It’s okay. Let’s put people where they want to work.

Anne Bibb:

However, not everybody wants to go back. Not everybody wants to work at home. So how do we make this work, because if you don’t figure it out, if we don’t figure it out, what’s going to happen is you’ve got people at home, you’ve got people in the office. Worst-case scenario here, you’re having a meeting and it’s got somebody sitting at home, and you’ve got a group of people in the office. And all of a sudden you’ve got this individual that’s sitting here on a conference call, dialed in, watching all these individuals collaborating in a meeting, and trying to pipe in but they can’t be heard because of all of these individuals that are sitting around a table in an office over speaking, and they’re not actively letting this individual that is remote collaborate.

Anne Bibb:

So there’s a gap here that needs to be pulled in, and we’ve got to make sure that there’s an equality gap there, of making sure that your remote team and your in-house team are actively being equalized. And that is what needs to be solved for here. It has not been solved for in the past. It is not solved for now. It needs to be solved for.

Luis:

Yeah. Definitely, that’s one of the big no-nos of hybrid, right? Is making the remote employee feel like second-class citizen. I do think that the increased focus that we need to have now… Although again, granted that some people thrive in the office. But it’s certainly more people thrive out of the office than the people that were working in the office, before? I’d say that the split, now that people have been given a taste of remote work and they can say to their bosses “Well, I’ve been working remotely for the past six months. Clearly I can do my job remotely. You can see by my performance metrics that I can do it equally as good or better. Why are you calling me into the office?” I think that these conversations will happen much more than the “Oh when can I go back to the office?” Situation.

Luis:

Let’s say that 80% of employees, of knowledge workers let’s say to use an example. I know it’s not only knowledge workers working remotely, but it’s a good part of it. So let’s say that 80% of knowledge workers were working in the office. I think that the split will be closer to 50/50 now, employers allowing for it. So I think the conversation will be more that direction. So to your point, there are interesting solutions there. I don’t know if you’ve seen the… I think they’re called the Kobe or Kobo or something like that. It’s like an iPad robot slash neck that you can put in the conference table room and then the remote employees connecting through it, and they can wiggle it and turn their heads to the people who’s talking, et cetera. It’s like a small little head, like in Futurama, that sits in the table and draws attention to itself. I mean, some people have told me that it’s a bit demeaning, but I think it’s funny. I wouldn’t mind being disembodied head in the room, but-

Anne Bibb:

I have not seen that, but that sounds a little… That sounds interesting. A little scary, but a little interesting.

Luis:

Yeah. Yeah it’s funny, right? We need to figure out ways to make this happen. Now personally, I don’t know how you feel about this, I like and I tell sometimes with my guests about the one remote all remote rule, where, “Okay you guys want to be in the office? Fine. You love guys, people. You like to be in the office. Sure. You be in the office. But then when there’s a meeting, everyone goes to their own room or cubicle or whatever and opens their laptop and we have the meeting, each person with their individual laptop so that doesn’t happen.” Now from my experience, this is the best way to do things so that the remote people are on even footing, but it also feels kind of silly for the people that are all in the office, to need to pretend they aren’t.

Anne Bibb:

I’ve actually participated in meetings like that, where you can see, even in the same room, I can see people behind other people. So they’re literally in the same room but they’re all on laptops. So it’s not a bad idea. But even outside of meetings, my larger concern is: In a hybrid slash remote situation, let’s say that there is a company that is expanding and becoming more geographically diverse, right? There is a pod of people that has a tendency to go out more. Whereas the more geographically diverse individuals, because they’re not in that smaller area, they can’t go out to lunch together, or go out for happy hour after work, because they don’t live in that area. So therefore they’re missing out on those employee engagement type activities, or just hanging out, and therefore they don’t feel as connected to that group. So even outside of the meetings, there’s those little misses on connections that are happening in these types of scenarios that also need to be fixed.

Luis:

So, what are some fixes?

Anne Bibb:

See, again, I don’t have the answers. But as a global community, we need to come up with some solutions. And I think what’s beautiful here is that as we’re moving into this next phase, that we’re going to see some interesting solutions come up. That’s exactly what happened when the pandemic hit, right? For instance, I’ve been, along with a large group of individuals, talking about remote work and trying to help move remote work forward for years. I remember having conversations internally with stakeholders at organizations, or with clients, about “Yes we can do this remotely.” Or, “Yes this is possible.” Remote work is the art of the possible, it’s just a matter of figuring out the technology and the solution. And there was so much pushback until the pandemic hit. And then all of a sudden it was, “It is possible.” And everybody saw the art of the possible.

Anne Bibb:

And then all of the techn… It was almost like technology moved forward five years in the blink of a moment. So now here we are, and we’re moving from… We’re having another shift, right? We shifted from a fully in-office, partially, just a fraction of remote, to fully remote. And now we’re shifting into where there’s going to be partially remote and hybrid, and partially office. And I think with that shift that comes, there’s going to be that technological advancement of figuring out the hybrid collaboration, the hybrid engagement. I think that we’re going to see a big movement in the tech world of figuring out these solutions. And I’m waiting for that beauty to happen. I’m looking forward to seeing these things come to life.

Luis:

Yeah. There are some interesting startups doing work in that space. I’m also looking forward a lot to what they’re coming up to. But I actually think that more than technological solutions, it’s people like you and me that need to come up with the strategies and the systems, right? Because strategy and systems are always better than tools and software, and I think that it’s up to people like you and me that are working on day-to-day to come up with the solutions and share them with the world. That’s what I try to do at any rate. I’m not always successful at it, but I do feel that, like you said, this is a massive experiment that has been running for almost 12 months now with most of the knowledge workers around the world. And now we need to start drawing conclusions from that experiment and figuring out the way forward. And it’s a massive task, and hopefully conversations like this will help us find a path forward. That’s my hope, at any rate.

Anne Bibb:

I 100% agree. And I’m constantly also having conversations with other peers, just like this one. But I’m also reaching out to other remote work and hybrid work and customer experience partners and saying, “What are you doing? What’s happening today?” Because even as this shift happens, what we’re doing today is going to be different in six months. It is constantly moving, not just from a technological view, but also from a people and employee experience view. Right? Because going back to what you just said, it isn’t all about tools and technology. It’s about what our employees need, and what is… As we put them first and as we continue to think about what their needs are, constantly taking into consideration what it is that they are wanting, what it is that they are needing. So spending time and just asking, “Hey, how are you?” Talking to them and listening. If we’re not listening, we can sit here and develop tools and technology all day long, but it might not be what they need.

Luis:

Yeah. So let’s actually use that want, need and like. I like it how you put it in those few words, right? Let’s talk a bit about your team at SupportNinja. You’re the Global Head of Customer Experience. You are a real international team, a real international company. I mean, I usually… So we were talking before we started, we were talking about that I’ve never been to the States but I have many American friends that I made in the gaming world. I always find myself making fun of them because they’re telling me how diverse their company is. And I’m like, “No, you just have different colored Americans.” But you are in a business, I mean SupportNinja, you have people worldwide, right? So that is real, true diversity in my book.

Luis:

And now with that kind of diversity, of course there exists a lot of different local cultures in the team. And what does that look like managing those wants, those needs and those likes from different cultures?

Anne Bibb:

That is a great question. So, one of the reasons that I joined SupportNinja recently… I’ve been here about two months now. And one of the reasons that I joined this organization was its pure focus on employee first and employee experience. And the desire to expand more across more countries and more geographies, which I’ve done in other organizations. As we expand geographically across more countries, it is important to think about putting that culture and that local geography first. It is important that we of course maintain our foundational thought process of employee experience plus customer experience. Those things should remain at our core and our foundation, but as we expand as we go into new geographies, we also have to respect the local and the local culture and those local geographies and make sure that we are looking at each and every one of those as well.

Anne Bibb:

And that is, with any organization, always something that is a challenge because you have to look at everything from infrastructure to the local culture to the local HR laws which every country is special and different whenever you’re looking at that. And making sure that you are managing that from a project management perspective.

Luis:

Yeah. Tell me about it. There are a bunch. That’s actually something that DistantJob does for our clients. We handle all of that for our clients, and some countries have some particularly hard-to-follow HR laws. I mean, France is a nightmare for sure.

Anne Bibb:

We are not in France.

Luis:

Right. Keep it like that. Anyway, okay. So tell me a bit about how is it working with the team, and how is it working with the team that is so distributed? What are some common team rituals that help you all keep up to speed with one another, with all the people in the different locations.

Anne Bibb:

So we do a few things. We have regular… And each team manages things differently. So for instance, my team, we have a daily touch base, just to make sure that we are staying… And it can be just 10 minutes, right? 10 minutes, what’s your daily score, one to 10, how are you doing? Just make sure that everything is okay. And if we notice that anybody, their number’s dropping below a four on a regular basis, that’s a signal, right? Obviously this person’s struggling. Let’s make sure everything’s okay. Reach out to them individually. And then we also have larger, more in-depth team meetings once a week just to make sure information is being cascaded appropriately. But we try and do as much asynchronously as possible from that remote standpoint. So we have all of our asynchronous work where we are trying to communicate. And this organization specifically is transitioning more asynchronously, which is a culture change. It does take some work to shift to that asynchronous strategy and to get everybody into that written form of communication.

Anne Bibb:

And that takes some work. So, trying to get off of that, “Hey can you jump onto a Zoom for 10 minutes?” “Hey can you set up a 30-minute call?” Do we need one? Can we work through this asynchronously? And just making sure that we have that documentation. Building our SOPs out, making sure that we have all of our SOPs documented and kept up to speed. That is huge for any remote organization to make sure that everything is documented. So that is a big thing that we’re working through right now, and making sure that everybody has access to that. So transparency, trust, autonomy, documentation, that is how we as an organization… And quite frankly, any largely remote organization is going to be successful.

Luis:

Absolutely. Documentation is huge. Just the fact that I’m increasingly a fan of wikis. I think that it’s incredibly valuable to have a company wiki where people can just… I mean obviously asking questions is always encouraged. I always say to the people in my team that there are no dumb questions. But it’s better if you can have the information a la carte and you don’t need to ask a question, you can just look it up. That’s preferable because as much as asking questions is great, that takes other people’s time and maybe not especially asynchronously. It’s easier to get an answer to your question if you can look it up in a wiki instead of waiting for an answer. So I’m definitely a fan of that.

Luis:

Now to your point about the asynchronous communication, what does that look like? What does transition look like? What strategies have you taken to adopt it? Because I know this is a big struggling point for many people, both on the employer side and on the employee side. Because on one hand most of the employees don’t particularly enjoy doing it because it takes them off their rhythm and interrupts their day in ways that make them not being able to focus on much on their work. On the other hand, especially in the managerial part, a lot of managers fel that they need to have regular touchdowns with teams and people and have some face-to-face time, which I can definitely understand. I don’t want to diminish the importance of face-to-face time. But it truly disrupts people.

Anne Bibb:

Well, and I don’t want to diminish the importance of that either. I still have one-on-ones with my team. I feel that is very important to still get to know and have that… Whether it’s weekly, biweekly, whatever you feel is important, that your employee needs. Employees need that time. Meetings, however, I feel very strongly that you don’t need a meeting with 50 people on them five times a week, and you don’t need back-to-back meetings. I’ve been in organizations where I literally was in a meeting back-to-back for nine hours a day, and many of those meetings had the same people on them throughout the day. So by the end of the day, you have been in meetings all day long and literally had no time in order to be able to do any of the action items from the meetings that you’ve been in. It was just a waste of time, effort and energy.

Anne Bibb:

So by shifting to an asynchronous form of communication where you’re documenting SOPs, and people know where to go, to your point, whether it’s a wiki or a Notion or a Confluence, or whatever form of documentation, they know where to go to get that information. And even better, if there is some way that people have to update that, and keep it updated, even better because then it is constantly updated and you’re not working off of old information. Then that is an easier shift to an asynchronous form of communication.

Anne Bibb:

Now another thing that I really like to do is move individuals, move organizations, to: Can everybody try and make sure that their meetings are in this three-hour, four-hour time frame of your day? Because then you’ve got the rest of your day to work on everything that came out of those meetings. All of your responding to email, responding to your Slacks, working on your whatever you have to work on, the creativeness time, to get everything that is moving in your brain. If you’re constantly talking and Zooming and looking at your computer screen, and you’re not allowing the creative side of your brain to actually come up with the thought process and come up with some really beautiful and innovative things to help move your organization forward. So if you can just block off part of your day to be able to actively do the things that you need to do, it’s really helpful to be able to block off that asynchronous time of your day.

Luis:

Oh yeah, for sure. For sure. And also, I think that your point about 50 people, for sure. That’s just a huge waste of everyone’s time. I do like to follow the dinner party rule, where you have seven people maximum at the table. If you have any more than that it’s actually two tables, and then the conversation is split. Right? So I think that dinner party rule is very useful. I do vehemently oppose to Zoom calls with more than seven people.

Anne Bibb:

I’ve never heard the dinner party rule before, but I’m going to use that. I’m okay with town halls, or something like that, once a month, once a quarter, whatever. You’re getting this mass communication out. I totally understand that concept. But when it’s something… I love that dinner party rule and I’m going to use that again. Thanks for sharing that.

Luis:

Sure. Please, go ahead. Happy to help. So let’s shift gears a bit and go into some rapid fire questions because I do want to mindful of your time. And these questions are rapid fire, but the answers don’t need to be. Please feel free to expand as much as you’d like.

Luis:

So let’s say, and I know this is a lot of money because you are at the big company, but let’s say you have $100 to spend with each person working with you. And obviously because you’re working with so many people, you can’t just look and just give a custom gift for each one. You need to buy in bulk, right? It could be software, it could be an experience, it could be something else. But you do need to give the same thing to everyone. What would you give them?

Anne Bibb:

Oh my goodness.

Luis:

And you can’t cheat and say you’d give them a $100 gift card, because that’s the same as giving them the money.

Anne Bibb:

I was going to go the easy way out.

Luis:

Yeah exactly.

Anne Bibb:

So actually, my boss just showed me the coolest thing that I had never seen before and I can’t believe that I had never seen it. It’s a Rocketbook. Have you ever seen one of those?

Luis:

A rock book?

Anne Bibb:

It’s called a Rocketbook.

Luis:

What does a Rocketbook do?

Anne Bibb:

It’s this book that you can take notes in, and I guess it transfers information into… I really want to dig more into it. But the video that he showed me was like, you write on it, and you can erase it. And I guess it can actually transfer information into your computer. It’s like a digital notebook.

Luis:

That sounds great.

Anne Bibb:

It really looked so cool. So if I had $100, I think that was within the budget. That’s what I would get everybody.

Luis:

All right. That sounds great. It’s probably more than $100, but that’s just a guideline, right? That’s just a guideline. If you think that everyone would benefit from having one of those, and it does sound pretty cool, I’ll take it. I’ll take it. So what about yourself? What purchase had made your work life easier or more productive in the past year?

Anne Bibb:

What purchase has made… Actually, I haven’t gotten it yet. But I ordered it. I actually bought myself a standing desk. I’m waiting for it. So I’m very excited, and I’m looking forward to it being delivered. It’s been back ordered and I’m waiting for it, but I’m so excited for it and I can’t wait for it to arrive.

Luis:

Yeah. So I have a friend that went down that rabbit hole, and let me tell you, then you get more demanding. Because next you’ll want to be buying a treadmill desk so you can walk while you work and it never ends. But you’re going to be very fit and healthy, for sure.

Anne Bibb:

I’m down for it.

Luis:

It gets addictive apparently. Now, me I’m happy continuing remaining a slob so I’m not going down the rabbit hole. All right. Tell me about books. Do you usually gift books? Is gifting books a thing that you do?

Anne Bibb:

It is not a thing that I do, because people are so specific about… I’ve noticed that, at least with the people I know, they are so specific about the books that they read. They either read a specific genre or self-help or fantasy. So I have a tendency to just let them pick their own books.

Luis:

Okay. So what about for yourself. What books have influenced you the most? Or if you were going to gift your younger self, you can pick how younger, a book, what book would you gift your younger self?

Anne Bibb:

Oh gosh. There have been so many different books I have read over the last year, and of course because you’re asking me, I can’t even think of the last book that I read. I know that there’s one sitting on my nightstand right now and I can picture it but I can’t think of the name of it. And I was just reading it last night.

Luis:

Well, you can just say Lord of the Rings if you want.

Anne Bibb:

How about Lord of the Rings?

Luis:

But I mean, specifically regarding business and working remotely and et cetera, doesn’t need to be recent but I’m interested in knowing what was something that had an impact on you?

Anne Bibb:

I’ve read several of the remote work ones, because I find them very interesting. But the Art of Working Remotely by Scott Dawson is one of the most recent that I’ve read, but I’ve read several of them because every time one comes out I’m like, “What is different about this one? What is different about that one?” I’ve read Karen Mangia’s. I’ve read many of them. But The Art of Working Remotely was the most recent.

Luis:

Nice. And it’s a lovely title. I wish I would’ve thought of that title. It’s a really good title.

Anne Bibb:

I know.

Luis:

Okay. So let’s move on to the final question. This one has a bit of a longer setup, so please bear with me. So let’s say that you’re hosting a dinner. I know it’s a controversial topic these times, but once you’re allowed to host a dinner let’s say that you choose to host one with the precautions that need to be in place in place. Right? Over dinner, there’s going to be a round table about remote work and the future of work, and in attendance are the top executives from the biggest tech companies from all around the world. Now the twist is that the dinner is happening at the Chinese restaurant, and you as the host get to pick the message that goes inside the fortunate cookie. So what message is inside the fortune cookie?

Anne Bibb:

It was all a dream.

Luis:

Wow. I like that. I like… That is great. That is actually… That is probably one of my favorites ever.

Anne Bibb:

And this is what happens when my filter is broken. I figure that if that was the message that everybody would laugh and it would start everything off lighthearted and it would be very humorous.

Luis:

That is very insightful, actually. Thanks Anne. That makes a lot of sense, because you would actually… It would make the conversation much easier. So it’s actually a twist. That’s a nice twist. Thank you for that.

Anne Bibb:

Absolutely.

Luis:

All right. So now that we’ve ended and actually we’re ending in a great note, I do want you to tell me to tell the listeners, where can they reach out to you? Where can they continue this conversation? And of course, what are you up to and what is SupportNinja up to?

Anne Bibb:

Right now SupportNinja is in the process, as I said, of expanding cross-geographically. We are in the process of going around the world. We are just trying to conquer the globe from an outsourcing perspective and are looking forward to helping our customers as much as we can. And anyone can reach out to me at Anne A N N E at supportninja.com or on LinkedIn, I’m Anne A N N E Bibb B I B B. And feel free to reach out to me any time, and I’m more than happy to help.

Luis:

All right. Anne it was an absolute pleasure having you here. Thank you so much for being a part of this. I had a blast. Thanks. Thank you so much.

Anne Bibb:

Thank you. Thanks for having me.

Luis:

And thank you for listening, ladies and gentlemen. This was the DistantJob Podcast, a podcast about leading and building awesome remote teams. See you next week.

Luis:

And so we close another episode of the DistantJob Podcast. And if you enjoyed the episode, please you can help us out by sharing it on social media. That would be great. It’s how we reach more listeners, and the more listeners we have the more awesome guests I can get in touch and convince to participate in these conversations that are a joy to have for me, and I hope they’re a joy for you to listen to as well. You can also help a lot leaving reviews on iTunes or your podcast syndication service of choice. Reviews are surprisingly helpful in helping the podcast get to more listeners.

Luis:

Now another thing that you might want to do is go to distantjob.com/blog/podcast, click on your favorite episode, any episode really, and subscribe. By subscribing you will get a notification whenever a new episode is up, and whenever we get the transcripts of the episode up so you can actually peruse the conversations in text form.

Luis:

And of course, if you need to find to find a great employee for your team, a great remote employee, you should take the whole world into consideration and not just hire locally, not just look to hire in your country. Look around the whole world because that’s the talent pool that contains the best talent. And to help you with that, again, distantjob.com is the perfect place to start. You will tell us who you need and we will make sure you get the best possible candidate 40% faster than the industry standard.

Luis:

And with that, I bid you adieu. See you next week on the next episode of DistantJob Podcast.

More ways to listen:

Working from home might be a dream come true for many. But it’s not the case for everyone; some people enjoy the chaos and noise of onsite offices.

During this podcast episode, Anne Bibb shares valuable insights on how the current debate should not be whether to shift towards a fully remote organization vs. going back to the office. Business leaders should reflect upon where their employees work at best? And base their decision on their employee’s needs.

 

Highlights:

  • The importance of being transparent during the hiring process
  • Effective tips to successfully manage your virtual team
  • Insights of companies shifting towards a hybrid model post-covid
  • Tips for companies that are going into a hybrid model
  • What does building an employee-first company really mean

 

Book Recommendations:

 

Don’t forget to SUBSCRIBE so you won’t miss all of the other interesting episodes that we have coming up in the next few weeks!