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Building and growing a successful remote business with Richard Fallah

Serial entrepreneur, Richard Fallah is the founder and CEO of Vbout, a leading marketing automation platform. Their multichannel software helps businesses grow their marketing footprint.
He is an advocate of empathy and self-awareness, passionate about working in a small team and building great products.

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Luis:

Welcome, ladies and gentlemen, to another episode of the DistantJob podcast. This is Luis, your usual host on this podcast that’s all about building and leading remote teams, awesome remote teams. My guest today is Richard Fallah. Richard is the founder and CEO of Vbout, a multichannel marketing automation software. Yeah, he is an evangelist about marketing technology, an advocate of empathy and self-awareness, and lovers of all things consciousness which is something that I read on his website and I want to talk with him about. Richard, welcome to the podcast.

Richard Fallah:

Thank you, Luis, for having me.

Luis:

It’s an absolute pleasure. JP always finds me the nicest people to talk to, so I am sure that this will be a great conversation. Thumbs up to JP, our man in the arena, the guy who, if you go to a conference and you learn about DistantJob, you probably learned it from JP because he is traveling the breadth of the United States helping people find awesome remote employees.

Richard Fallah:

Perfect. The guy’s an awesome dude, I met him at one of the expos in Casper. You had a booth in pretty much… A lot of people were wondering who’s the man in the red suit so I spoke to him, I interviewed him on our video podcast actually.

Luis:

Awesome.

Richard Fallah:

Yeah, it was great.

Luis:

Has that been published?

Richard Fallah:

Yeah, it is, it is. If you go to vbout.com/blog, or you just find the blog from the upper link, you’ll be able to find one of the articles about 11 startups we interviewed at that conference, and definitely JP is one of them.

Luis:

Okay, so I will definitely share that on the show notes.

Richard Fallah:

Sure.

Luis:

I want to talk a bit about your setup. I mean obviously, this is all about remote and I want to ask you, how has remote work made your business possible or helped you make it better?

Richard Fallah:

Yeah, that’s a great question. I’ve been working in remote environments all my life pretty much, or at least since I started my online digital business journey. At first I was digital agency, so I was running… we were building websites and doing hosting and all of those online marketing. With that, I had teams in India, Bangladesh, Pakistan, Lebanon and here in the States and other States as well. I kind of learned that-

Luis:

[crosstalk 00:02:41].

Richard Fallah:

Yeah, that never goes to sleep. I mean obviously there are some issues that comes along with being in a different time zone and stuff. I learned that remote work is possible, you don’t have to be in the same office. There are some ups and downs to it, there are cons and pro just like everything else, but you can manage to run a business, create a business and value out of nothing in a remote environment team. That’s sort of how I started.

Richard Fallah:

Then we launched Vbout, we stopped being service company. With Vbout, now we’re 19 people, and we have that setup still where we have hubs I would say, New York, Lebanon, Philippine, Canada, and we kind of managed to work in different units I would say.

Luis:

That’s incredible, that’s incredible. How many hubs are these?

Richard Fallah:

Here in the States, I’m usually back and forth in between. My backend dev team who’s in Lebanon, there’s about 12 people there on the engineering side. They work closely together, and we have an external engineer as well. The dynamics of the team especially the backend when working in the same office is usually, I would say, the productivity is a little bit higher most of the time. That’s the backend.

Richard Fallah:

Here in the States we do marketing, sales and business dev. Canada we have two guys on a success management team, so they speak to the customers in the, and they meet every week. In the Philippines they do it remote, so they do just the backend work, lead gen kind of qualification process.

Luis:

Okay, got it, got it. I want to talk about how you tie all these parts together, because I was looking at your LinkedIn profile and you honestly… I mean I look at LinkedIn profiles every week, dozens of them, and yours actually got the laugh out of me because if you wrote there that you are, you write there that you are CEO on Monday, CFO on Tuesday, CEO on Wednesday, CMO on Thursday, and then on Friday you’re a psychologist in HR. Plus other things on Saturday and Sunday.

Luis:

I can see from there that you are actually deep into every aspect of your company. I mean number one, how do you manage to do, how do you manage to pay attention to all the aspects of your business without burning out? I guess B is part of the answer to A, what kind of systems do you have in place, personal system to manage this?

Richard Fallah:

Sure. This is a great question, man, funny that you read this, they recently put it. As you progress in the company, if you’re a two people company, they never saw you being a CEO is completely different when you’re 10, and then when you’re 20, and then obviously as you grow.

Richard Fallah:

At this stage that we’re in right now, we’re moving from seed to series a sort of if you put us on the scale of how you fundraise or where growth in the growth mode. That means is I cannot be in every single aspect of the company, but I have to be involved because I need to make sure the processes are being implemented properly.

Richard Fallah:

The guys or the team that’s leading that particular unit, so let’s say people running the marketing stuff or those doing the sales, I need them to… I always say hire people who would tell you what to do. That’s not a quote from me, that’s actually, I forgot who said it.

Luis:

I live by that, I live by that. You have a fan, I am a fan of that strategy, yes.

Richard Fallah:

I let them run whatever they’re doing, I have a vision, I always try to meet with them individually and in a group environment. I think doing that practice is very important. Aligning with them individually, what their personal goals are, where they want to be, where the company’s headed, and then doing it also in a group environment is important.

Richard Fallah:

Making sure that they take in my vision, the direction that I would like it to go, and obviously let them execute, make mistakes, come back, identify where the mistakes are. Sometimes I identify mistakes and I wait for them to identify it, and if they don’t I just point it out.

Richard Fallah:

There’s a little process that I got to where I don’t have to be involved in every single details, I don’t have to, let’s say write the email campaign or go in and do every single editing, but at least I oversee what’s going on, and I would like the outcome to compliment the vision of where the company is headed. That’s kind of how I do it, and that’s why I have to put my sales hat on when the sales team is overwhelmed, and now we’re bombarded with demos so I have to jump in and do demos. I don’t mind it, I love it.

Richard Fallah:

Sometimes the support team is overwhelmed and I jump in and I handle some tickets, and then I also have to make sure that the responses are within the company, what I would say is the gracious, amazing support that we provide and we pride on. Similarly with the dev, I let them do their own thing, but at the end of the day, where the product is headed, the quality of the work, I just need reports because in the dev, my dev unit is pretty powerful. My CTO is my partner and I have an amazing team leader.

Richard Fallah:

These guys run the show, I’m not as involved there, but at least I’m always like, “Hey guys, what’s new? Do you need me for anything?” I’m speaking to the customers. Do you know what I mean?

Luis:

Yeah, for sure.

Richard Fallah:

I guess to step back and summarize is, I’m not doing the minute execution, I’m just doing it at the grand scale from the top level just to make sure that the execution is done as I foresee the company. That’s one.

Luis:

Yeah. I actually get the feeling, and maybe I’m wrong, correct me if I’m wrong, but I get the feeling that you know what being in those trenches are, right? You just said that even though you’re the CEO of the company, if it’s needed, you go into the support backend and you answer some tickets. You act even though you might not be the best at customer support because that’s not your job, you definitely know what it is to work in customer support and how things should be handled there.

Luis:

Maybe you don’t know how to code because that’s a more specific thing that you need an education on, but you probably when you go into the dev meetings, you probably end up doing some work, you’re solving even if it’s planning work or something like that. Correct?

Richard Fallah:

Absolutely. We have weekly meetings at the end of the week to summarize everything that was released. Every single sprint, every single feature we’re working on, what were the roadblocks, bottlenecks. At least I know when I’m speaking to the client. I don’t like to be blinded, right? There are some CEOs, they don’t care about all that stuff. Maybe in the future it might be harder for me, but at least for the time being, I’m just enjoying it. I know the details of what’s going on, I can speak on every aspect of your company, I can even project where it’s headed. Yeah.

Luis:

That’s cool. Let’s talk a bit about meetings, because meetings I find are so crucial for maintaining a remote business. I know that there are some books that are completely against… some management books that are completely against meetings. Meetings certainly got the bad reputation over the last 10 years, but when done properly, they are such an incredible tool especially when people are across several continents.

Luis:

My main question to you is… as you said, your development team, let’s take the development, but you can take me through other teams if they have other setups. Your development team, I assume that most of them are working together in a coworking space, at least that’s the idea that I got from how you explained it.

Richard Fallah:

Yeah. We have a sizable office in overseas. It’s an office, they will work together, they interact often.

Luis:

Okay. They actually are working in an office, but they are managed remotely. How do you prevent the effect of being a disembodied half on a wall in front of a room full of people? How do you manage to connect with a room full of people when you are that?

Richard Fallah:

I don’t know if I get your question right. When I’m doing meeting with the team overseas and they’re in the same room and I’m far you mean?

Luis:

Yeah, exactly.

Richard Fallah:

I mean obviously it’s from a… it’s a Skype or GoToMeeting or whatever you use, and I’m sure the camera’s on because I need them to pick up on my facial expressions, and I do visit them every quarter. I have sessions with every single one, we have group meetings a couple of times.

Richard Fallah:

I don’t think meetings are a bad thing as long as you go into the meeting knowing exactly what you’re going to discuss, and knowing when people… and tell them, “Guys, we don’t wanna go in into a, this is, this is not an activity that we’re gonna be here just voicing ours. We’re just gonna be as efficient as possible 30 minutes, we’re gonna do a cutoff, everybody has to be quick on what they wanna do and what they wanna say.”

Richard Fallah:

If you do that, then you have takeaways and action, the key action after the meeting, then the meeting was effective. You only do the meetings when you have to because it’s takes away… If you have five people in a meeting, that’s five devs or sales. You calculate the hourly rate at the end of the quarter or the year, then you have tens of thousands of dollars in meeting time. That’s why I say you have to be very efficient, very transparent, knowing what do you need to do first, and then having key takeaways, and very strict duration like cutoff time, 30 minutes, cutoff time 30 minutes.

Luis:

Okay, so you only do meetings when you feel like you need. What’s your criteria for deciding that something needs a meeting?

Richard Fallah:

Well, I have a weekly meeting with the sales team so they can keep us up-to-date on what’s going on. Also because it’s better that they don’t just operate as a unit all the time, they have to operate or cross contaminate a little bit, I guess is the word, you know, to see that I’m involved because they have things that might fall back on and they need answers. Also, to make sure that the work is getting done and KPIs are in place because we have investors.

Richard Fallah:

I would say we do a weekly meeting with every department almost, and I’m on demand if people need me or they have a question. If I feel they could solve it themselves with low critical thinking, I let them do it, but if it gets stuck somewhere and they need to call I’m always available, so we can do the call 10 to 15 minutes and we get it out, you know?

Luis:

Yeah, of course.

Richard Fallah:

Other than that, there’s no need for other meetings unless I’m bored, but that never happens

Luis:

I guess. You did talk that you try to talk with everyone on one-on-one. Does this happen by camera as well, or is it when you were onsite visiting?

Richard Fallah:

I try to speak to the team, I would say the team leader but not directly with the person. If there’s any issues and things, I try to teach the team leader how to solve it or tell them to figure out their way, because leadership doesn’t come… Leadership is acquired over time, and part of leadership is knowing how to deal with the team individually and as a group.

Richard Fallah:

If there’s deficiency somewhere, somebody is producing 70% of their capacity for two days, they have a temporary issue, but somebody’s producing 70% for two weeks, there’s a chronic, long-term issue that you have to step in and see why. Do they need a break for a month? Is it a sickness, illness? Do you know what I mean?

Luis:

Yeah.

Richard Fallah:

I let them handle it, but every once in a while I reach out to individuals and they have the conversation directly to make sure everything’s okay, the leadership is treating them well. Yeah, just to be there close to them. These are people at the end of the day, right?

Luis:

Right. Yeah, exactly. It’s remarkably easy to forget that when everything happens through email or through Slack chat or stuff like that, so that’s why why the one-on-ones are so important. Do you have any structure when you do the one-on-ones? Is there any format that you like to follow, or do you just make things happen as you get there?

Richard Fallah:

No. I mean I used to, I would say, do The One Minute Manager book, that’s a book that says to give somebody one minute to direct them on what went wrong or could have been better, and one minute telling them, “Hey, you did a good job, blah, blah, blah. You know, this is great. This is the impact of the work you’ve done. I think I see longterm.” When you do this, it works.

Richard Fallah:

Now, the actual team leader let’s say it’s doing that, but I do it on the entire team. I do like minute meeting with the team and tell them, “Hey, this is great, this is what we’re doing, uh, and this can be done better.” That’s it, that’s the format.

Luis:

Okay. I wanted to start your bio from the website where it says that you are an advocate of empathy and self-awareness, and I find these things challenging over video. Again, there’s limited time where you can go to be on site. What kind of, I guess the tips or tricks or strategies that you follow to be able to create these bonds with people over long distances?

Richard Fallah:

Yes. Listen, it’s not easy. Tonality is important because people pick up… If you’re not seeing someone and you cannot feel the physical, that you’re going to fall back on the other instincts you have which is voice. Being very cautious about tonality and how you speak to them, you can soften your voice, you can show happiness through the voice. Also, you can look mad or you can look sad if you have the camera on.

Richard Fallah:

There’s some basic, I would say, body language stuff that you need to leverage especially the voice, I would say. If you want to tell someone they did something wrong, you can tell them, “Hey, you did this wrong” or you can say, “No, this could have been done slightly better that way.” The same exact message can be delivered and understood differently, one of them is like you’re trying to point out the wrong, the other one is you’re trying to help them improve. You know what I mean?

Luis:

Yeah.

Richard Fallah:

There’s a very fine line between the two approaches. When I say self-aware is just being self-aware that if I say it this way, they’re going to get offended, but if I say that way, they’re going to actually appreciate it.

Luis:

Yeah, right. So it’s keeping aware that they are not the mistake they made. Good people make mistakes all the time, that doesn’t mean that they’re not good at their job, that that just means that they did something that didn’t go as well as it could have gone.

Richard Fallah:

Sure. We all make mistakes. As long as you learn, like if you do it the first time, second time, third time then it starts like, all right, empathy, I got to process it a little bit now here undermining my effort to be very careful about how I… Just don’t undermine that. As a leader, you put a lot of effort, and just being self-aware. They have to appreciate that too, right?

Luis:

Yeah. It’s trust, right? I try to be very tolerant to people’s mistakes, but you know, it depends on trust. I need to trust that you are doing your best to deliver your best work, and by the time you do the same mistake for the third time, then my trust is starting to go away. It’s important to be able to build that trust both ways. They also need to be able to trust me that they have their back, that their job is in a safe situation, all of that, right?

Richard Fallah:

Exactly.

Luis:

It needs to go both ways.

Richard Fallah:

Super important, yup, super important. Trust, just super important.

Luis:

You mentioned that you’re going on the first round, you had the seed money. How long have you been working at this?

Richard Fallah:

I don’t know, five, six years.

Luis:

Okay. Five, six years. What have you learned in managing the company distributively for the past six years? What’s the lesson that you learned that you weren’t expecting, something that changed your mind about something?

Richard Fallah:

I guess processes are super important, you have to have processes in place, but never be married to the processes where you can not let them go or change them. Be open to how people actually doing the job can improve these processes, all right. I would say to be extremely patient not only from the business side of things, of how the business is growing, and changing, and evolving, but also how you deal with people and expectations of people.

Richard Fallah:

Because you want people to be going with you at a hundred miles per hour, but the fact is nobody can go that fast, and you just have to make sure everybody is almost on the same pace as the overall potential of the company. If everybody operates a 70%, 80% of the time, everybody has to be on that bandwagon. If everybody’s operating at 80% capacity all the time, then everybody has to be on the bandwagon, you know what I mean?

Luis:

Yeah.

Richard Fallah:

But if they drop below 50, and then the entire company can just crash. I think it’s just having that in place.

Luis:

Yeah, absolutely. I also think that it’s important that… The self-awareness at the top is also important to have that to keep your tendencies in check. Let’s say that you as a boss are a workaholic, you need to put yourself in check and know that it’s not reasonable to expect everyone else to produce like you. It’s not that they’re incompetent, it’s just that your bar is very high.

Luis:

On the other hand off the spectrum, if you tend to have a very slow, easygoing rhythm and your employees aren’t producing as much as they should, it’s easy for you to fall in the trap saying, “Well, okay, you know. I’m all, they are, they seem to be going at a rate that’s similar to mine” or something like that, but you know that you have other things in your mind that don’t necessarily translate, it can’t be not necessarily quantified in the same way because you are overseeing stuff.

Luis:

When you go from when you go from producer to manager and to leader, you’re not going to be able to just produce as much as you used to because leadership is part of your production, right?

Richard Fallah:

Yeah, exactly, exactly. Nobody has the upside that you have as a CEO, and also the potential risk that you have as CEO. I would say you have to be the hardest working guy in the company, that is for sure. If anybody else is working harder than you, that means there’s something that’s not quite right.

Luis:

Yeah, I agree.

Richard Fallah:

Yeah, that’s it. Everything you said is perfect. You’re working harder and you expect them to do the same, but you have to be realistic.

Luis:

Yeah.

Richard Fallah:

It’s never going to be the same. Well, you might have some winner employees you can rely on, but it comes back to trust versus skill.

Luis:

Yeah, exactly. You talked about processes, and I don’t remember who this quote is from, but it’s a very popular quote, “No plan survives contact with the enemy.” I honestly think that no processes survives contact with the team. Sometimes we work so hard on creating beautiful processes, and then when they don’t work out, our immediate ego-driven fallback is to say, “You’re not doing it right, my process is perfect.” How do you balance this? What is the point where you know that, “Okay, I have to fix the people or the person,” or, “No, maybe I actually need to tweak my process”?

Richard Fallah:

Right. I think teams are always opposed to change. I mean they want it and they talk about it, and I’m open, but when you produce new changes and new processes they’re always like, “Aw man, I’ll have to… “. This is a human nature moreso than a personal thing because you feel comfortable, you have a comfort zone, they have a way of working.

Richard Fallah:

I would say when I introduce a process, and we don’t do it often, but it’s always like, “All right, so we need to do this. Let’s test it out just like everything else. Let’s test it out lightly and see how the team perceives it, what the results are, and when the results come back if it’s all personal objections, and that means that the process, that’s not, that doesn’t give me enough information to process. I need objective results from it.”

Richard Fallah:

We finished more sprints because of this process. Is the team now causing less distraction to the CTO because that process is letting them think on their own? I’m just giving examples here.

Luis:

Of course.

Richard Fallah:

If that’s the case, that’s whether the results I look for. If somebody comes back and say, “You know, I’m actually, I’m having a hard time finishing a task, and I’m doing this, and it’s making me, I don’t know, give me headache at the end of the day.” I’m like, “This is a personal issue, it’s not going to cut it for me.”

Richard Fallah:

I would say introducing it slowly, testing it, and because every process works differently with different companies, so you have to see how that process would work within your company and the dynamics of the team. B, have the team be involved, and also the feedback obviously of the process is important.

Luis:

Got it. As a leader, sometimes you have to stand your ground because you are the one with the big picture. How do you balance that with listening to the feedback and knowing when to back down?

Richard Fallah:

Listen, I can’t say I’m perfect. There’s a lot of times when we put process together in a team, like we had a community, we had a book club we’re there for a while and the team was like, “We’re wasting too much time from being productive to reading books.” We had to stop it. We had a lot of things initially that I thought were be perfect, but then they took another shape and form. It’s ironic because some cultures appreciate some things more than others, right?

Luis:

Yeah.

Richard Fallah:

Some people are receptive to certain feedback in a certain way, then let’s say people here in the States versus people in Lebanon or people in the Philippines, they process things completely differently. With that in mind, you got to find a balance.

Richard Fallah:

As far as me standing ground on processes, I would have to measure the impact of it on the personal level from the employee side, on the business side of things, and from a general productivity as a team influence. If I score and it’s above 50 in all three or as an average, that means it’s good. Listen, not everything can be put into processes. Sometimes, the way I assess things is that I follow my gut instinct after I’ve done so much effort because every process that I put together, it’s so much effort and research done before I do it. You know?

Luis:

Yeah, absolutely.

Richard Fallah:

It’s not like, “Hey, I woke up, because I read a book and the book says ABC, I’m just going to go ahead and implement it.” I think that’s the wrong way to do it.

Luis:

Yeah, exactly. The next week you read another book and you go like, “Well, actually, you know, this time let’s do it differently. New processes for everyone.”

Richard Fallah:

I just adapt what I think is fit or optimize. I’ve had processes where I had to shut down because I saw the impact wasn’t that great and there’s so much injections, and I had processes that I get a lot of objections then to be continued, and actually helped us a lot.

Luis:

Yeah, that’s true. Actually, it’s nice to plant the flag here and tell that we recommend a lot of books in this show, we interview a lot of guests. It’s important for people learning about these topics to understand that it’s very easy to become possessed by ideas, possessed by ideas from books, possessed ideas from people specially if they’re charismatic or good speakers. There was this philosopher, I don’t remember if it was or Nietzsche that said something to the lines of, “Don’t be so sure that you have ideas, usually it’s ideas that that view,” something along this lines.

Luis:

The line about adapting is really important. Everything is a case by case situation, every person’s company, every person’s team is different, and usually when you try to get all your answer from a single source, it won’t work out well for you. That means that you’re possessed by ideas instead of actually using the pieces from several different sources to build your own ideas which is what you should be doing.

Richard Fallah:

Mm-hmm (affirmative), exactly.

Luis:

I am increasingly aware of the time that’s passing by, I want to be respectful of your time, so I want to transition to asking some rapid fire questions. The questions are rapid fire but the answers don’t have to be, feel free to expand as much as you like.

Richard Fallah:

Sure.

Luis:

If you have $100 to spend with each person working for you and you need to buy something at bulk, you can’t personalize it, what would you buy for them? It can be tools, hardware, software, whatever you like, but it needs to be the same for everyone.

Richard Fallah:

I would actually tell them to buy something for someone else in the company. I’ll give them $100 and tell them you have to buy something for the other person in the company.

Luis:

Okay, it’s a secret Santa.

Richard Fallah:

Secret Santa, so that let them do the work.

Luis:

Okay.

Richard Fallah:

No, but at least that kind of have them put the thought process and going out the person what they like and so on. I don’t know if this answer you’re looking forward.

Luis:

It’s new. Definitely no one, no one ever gave me that answer so that’s an interesting thing. I mean it’s going back to the empathy and to the team building. It’s actually a very nice idea because it makes you actually have to think about the other people on your team, so good one.

Richard Fallah:

Everybody’s going going to say, “Give me the $100 I’ll buy it.” Even if I buy something for one person it might not be for the other, and if I’m going to just go and buy some books or tickets to conferences and stuff, some of that might be relevant to some versus others. It’s not going to be universal to all of them that’s why I would do that.

Luis:

Got it. What about for yourself? What purchase has made your work life easier or more productive in the past year? No money limit this time.

Richard Fallah:

What purchase have made my life productive last year. I really don’t know if something I purchased or something I already owned and I just put to work more effectively. Honestly it’s just Vbout, I’ve been using Vbout. It’s not a self-promotion, it just organizing things there more effectively, obviously we invested in building it.

Luis:

It’s for free, I assume.

Richard Fallah:

Yeah, well, I just have my entire payroll to pay for it.

Luis:

Exactly, that’s true. It’s either that your cheapest resource or your most expensive resource, one of the two.

Richard Fallah:

I think it’s a collection of things actually, linking Vbout to Calendly, to our CRM, to GoToMeeting, to our landing page builder. I think the connection of systems is really will make a process be more efficient. We are in the age of integration, so if you don’t integrate, you’re going to die. I think what made my life very efficient is the ability for me to connect these. I think I’ve leveraged investing and connecting systems together through our APIs or through Zapier, and that have made my life easier in many ways.

Luis:

Awesome. You mentioned the book club, so I do need to ask, what book or books have you gifted the most?

Richard Fallah:

What book or books? I have some that are business, some are not. I think the book that I gifted the most because it was amazing is The Story Of The Human Body. That’s actually not a business book. Another great book is The Hard Things About Hard Things from Ben Horowitz, this is probably the most amazing one when it comes-

Luis:

I have read when I enjoyed it though. I have a ton of highlights on that one. Y.

Richard Fallah:

Yeah, it’s a great book. Other than that, there’s a lot of business. The Effective Executive is a very old book, but it gives you like an insight of how big CEOs managed to take struggling companies and just blow them up. These are good ones.

Luis:

Those are good recommendations. Thank you, sir. My final question, and then obviously I want you to talk a bit about you and your company, but the final question is, let’s say that you are hosting a dinner with top executives from Silicon Valley and tech companies from all over the world, the people who handle hiring and strategy and HR. You are doing the dinner in a Chinese restaurant and there’s a round table during the dinner about remote work and the future of work. Since you are the host and the restaurant is a Chinese restaurant, what is the message that you choose to put inside the Chinese fortune cookie that these people will crack open over dinner?

Richard Fallah:

That scenario is… the imagination is great, man.

Luis:

Thank.s.

Richard Fallah:

I have a one line, I have to just like one tip you mean? One line I got to put in to who, to the executives or to the hiring?

Luis:

The executives.

Richard Fallah:

Don’t neglect yourself or your family for the sake of the business.

Luis:

Wow. That isn’t expected but great advice, great advice.

Richard Fallah:

I mean obviously you can tell because you can be preaching and talking about business all day, but it might affect most executives who do not put enough effort, and time, and they sacrificed a lot for the business they’re probably not going to stay there for long. I’m assuming those who are doing it for awhile and doing a good job, they’re neglecting a lot of themselves and their families. That would be my a fortune cookie.

Luis:

Awesome, awesome fortune cookie. Richard, tell the listeners who want to continue the conversation with you, how can they do so, how can they find you, how can they find more about Vbout and how can Vbout help them?

Richard Fallah:

Yeah, sure. You can always reach me [email protected] Again, that’s [email protected], you can email me directly if you have any questions about hiring. We do have a resource like what you guys provide and just hire people remotely, them. I think it’s a great channel. You’re not only looking for people locally, like the pizza shop across the street, if they cannot find a pizza guy, they’re just screwed. Right?

Luis:

Exactly.

Richard Fallah:

You guys open up that channel for everyone. If you have any questions on that or whatever, [email protected] What we’re doing here is we built a full stack over simplifying the full stack marketing experience. When I mean full stack it’s just when a marketing team needs to execute on a campaign, they need tools together like a form, a landing page, a lead intelligence platform, they need a nurture campaign, some social management, et cetera, et cetera.

Richard Fallah:

This is what we call the stack, and we are simplifying the experience of running a full stack. That’s what Vbout does. If anybody’s interested in if they’re interested in using it for their own team, you can also talk to me. That’s it.

Luis:

Okay, Richard, thank you so much, man. It was a pleasure talking to you.

Richard Fallah:

Thank you, Luis.

Luis:

Thank you, sir.

Richard Fallah:

Awesome, thank you.

Luis:

We close another episode of the DistantJob podcast. If you enjoyed the episode, please, you can help us out by sharing it on social media, that would be great. It’s how we reach to more listeners, and the more listeners we have, the more awesome guests I can get in touch and convince to participate in these conversations that are a joy to have for me, and I hope they’re a joy for you to listen to as well.

Luis:

You can also help a lot leaving reviews on iTunes or your podcast syndication service of choice. Reviews are surprisingly helpful in helping the podcast get to have more listeners. Now, another thing that you might want to do is go to distantjob.com/blog/podcast, click on your favorite episode, then any episodes really and subscribe. By subscribing, you will get a notification whenever a new episode is up and whenever we get the transcripts off the episodes up so you can actually produce the conversations in text form.

Luis:

And of course, if you need to find a great employee for your team, a great remote employee, you should take the whole world into consideration and not just look to hire locally, not just look to hire in your country, look around the whole world, because that’s the talent pool that contains the best talent. To help you with that, again, distantjob.com is the perfect place to start. You will tell us who we need and we will make sure that you get the best possible candidate 40% faster than the industry standard. With that I bid you. see you next week on the next episode of DistantJob podcast.

More ways to listen:

More and more companies are transitioning to remote working teams as the global workforce develops to gain access to a larger talent pool, in order to work with the best talent in the world.

The benefits of remote work for organizations are more obvious than ever.

In this podcast episode, we get the chance to listen to Richard Fallah share his successful entrepreneurial journey and his views on building a successful business with remote teams. He believes leaders must engage their people with a compelling vision to boost employee’s performance and the business’ growth.

''I make sure that they take in my vision, the direction that I would like it to go, and obviously let them execute, make mistakes, come back, identify where the mistakes are.' Click To Tweet

What you will learn:

  • how remote work can help companies to produce rapid and durable growth
  • how to focus on areas of your business without burning out
  • practical strategies on managing remote teams
  • tips on bonding distributed teams together
  • how to provide a balance of positive and negative feedback
  • the importance of one-on one meetings in a distributed team

Book Recommendations:

 

This interview is part of the DistantJob podcast. To hear more from leaders and successful entrepreneurs on how to build and lead winning teams, check us out on Anchor.fm and on our website.

Don’t forget to SUBSCRIBE so you won’t miss all of the other interesting episodes that we have coming up in the next few weeks!

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